Spiritual Grammar: Genre and the Saintly Subject in Islam and Christianity by F. Dominic LongoSpiritual Grammar: Genre and the Saintly Subject in Islam and Christianity by F. Dominic Longo

Spiritual Grammar: Genre and the Saintly Subject in Islam and Christianity

byF. Dominic Longo

Hardcover | July 3, 2017

Pricing and Purchase Info

$62.61 online 
$65.00 list price
Earn 313 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

HURRY, ONLY 3 LEFT!
Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Spiritual Grammar identifies a genre of religious literature that until now has not been recognized as such. In this surprising and theoretically nuanced study, F. Dominic Longo reveals how grammatical structures of language addressed in two medieval texts published nearly four centuries apart, from distinct religious traditions, offer a metaphor for how the self is embedded in spiritual reality. Reading The Grammar of Hearts (Nahw al-qulub) by the great Sufi shaykh and Islamic scholar 'Abd al-Karim al-Qushayri (d. 1074) and Moralized Grammar (Donatus moralizatus) by Christian theologian Jean Gerson (d. 1429), Longo reveals how both authors use the rules of language and syntax to advance their pastoral goals. Indeed, grammar provides the two masters with a fresh way of explaining spiritual reality to their pupils and to discipline the souls of their readers in the hopes that their writings would make others adept in the grammar of the heart.
F. Dominic Longo is Assistant Professor of Theology and co-director of the Muslim Christian Dialogue Center at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota.
Loading
Title:Spiritual Grammar: Genre and the Saintly Subject in Islam and ChristianityFormat:HardcoverDimensions:256 pagesPublished:July 3, 2017Publisher:Fordham University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0823275728

ISBN - 13:9780823275724

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Longo engages in an intriguing comparative inquiry into spiritual grammar in medieval Arabic and Latin treatises.Delineating and crossing boundaries and genres, he explores a new confusing yet delightful subfield in the genre of comparative theological Islamo-Christian studies.