Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed History by Thomas GrahamSpy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed History by Thomas Graham

Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed History

byThomas Graham, Keith A. HansenForeword byRobert Huffstutler

Hardcover | July 20, 2015

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Much has been said and written about the failure of U.S. intelligence to prevent the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and its overestimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction under Saddam Hussein. This book focuses instead on the central role that intelligence-collection systems play in promoting arms control and disarmament.

Ambassador Thomas Graham Jr. and Keith Hansen bring more than fifty combined years of experience to this discussion of the capabilities of technical systems, which are primarily based in space. Their history of the rapid advancement of surveillance technology is a window into a dramatic reconceptualization of Cold War strategies and policy planning. Graham and Hansen focus on the intelligence successes against Soviet strategic nuclear forces and the quality of the intelligence that has made possible accurate assessments of WMD programs in North Korea, Iran, and Libya. Their important insights shed a much-needed light on the process of verifying how the world harnesses the proliferation of nuclear arms and the continual drive for advancements in technology.

Ambassador Thomas Graham Jr. is chairman of the Cypress Fund for Peace and Security in Washington, D.C. He served as general counsel of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency for fifteen years and was President Clinton's special assistant for arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament. Keith Hansen is consulting professor in...
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Title:Spy Satellites and Other Intelligence Technologies that Changed HistoryFormat:HardcoverDimensions:184 pages, 8 × 5 × 0.98 inPublished:July 20, 2015Publisher:University of Washington PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295997214

ISBN - 13:9780295997216

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Table of Contents

Foreword by Robert M. HuffstutlerPreface and AcknowledgmentsIntroduction

1. To Verity or Not to Verify2. Soviet Secrecy Fuels the Arms Race and Inhibits Verification3. U.S. Efforts to Understand Soviet Military Forces and Capabilities4. Strategic Arms Control Legitimizes Space-Based Reconnaissance5. Intelligence Support to Arms Control Activities6. National Technical Means of Verification Takes Center Stage7. "National Technical Means" Goes Multilateral8. Monitoring the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction9. Conclusion

PostscriptAppendixesA. Glossary of Acronyms and TermsB. Texts of NTM Provisions in Arms Control AgreementsC. Chronology of Key U.S. Reconnaissance CapabilitiesD. U.S. Atomic Energy Detection System (USAEDS)E. CTBT International Monitoring SystemF. U.S. Intelligence Community

NotesBibliographyAbout the AuthorsIndex

Editorial Reviews

Much has been said and written about the failure of U.S. intelligence to prevent the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, and its overestimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction under Saddam Hussein. This book focuses instead on the central role that intelligence-collection systems play in promoting arms control and disarmament.Ambassador Thomas Graham Jr. and Keith Hansen bring more than fifty combined years of experience to this discussion of the capabilities of technical systems, which are primarily based in space. Their history of the rapid advancement of surveillance technology is a window into a dramatic reconceptualization of Cold War strategies and policy planning. Graham and Hansen focus on the intelligence successes against Soviet strategic nuclear forces and the quality of the intelligence that has made possible accurate assessments of WMD programs in North Korea, Iran, and Libya. Their important insights shed a much-needed light on the process of verifying how the world harnesses the proliferation of nuclear arms and the continual drive for advancements in technology.I could not imagine two authors better experienced to tell this important story, and to continue to tell it in more detail as declassification permits. Likewise, it is hard to come up with a better example of how good intelligence can generate the transparency which defined U.S. and Soviet stability in the latter part of the twentieth century. - William O. Studeman, William O. Studeman