Squire: Book 3 Of The Protector Of The Small Quartet by Tamora PierceSquire: Book 3 Of The Protector Of The Small Quartet by Tamora Pierce

Squire: Book 3 Of The Protector Of The Small Quartet

byTamora Pierce

Paperback | August 24, 2004

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The third book in the New York Times bestselling series from the fantasy author who is a legend herself: TAMORA PIERCE.

The path to knighthood is full of surprises. . . .

Keladry of Mindelan dreams of becoming squire to the famous female knight Alanna the Lioness, but she worries that she will not be selected by her hero—perhaps not by any knight master. When Kel is picked instead by the legendary Lord Raoul, the unexpected honor shocks her enemies across the realm. Kel must quickly prove herself up to the task, mastering her fighting and leadership skills while discovering what it takes to be part of the royal guard. A new romance is blossoming as well, bringing with it the rush of first love and the unexpected challenges of balancing knight work and a relationship. All the while, Kel prepares for her biggest fear: the infamous “Ordeal,” the last challenge that stands between her and knighthood.

More timely than ever, the Protector of the Small series is Anti-Bullying 101 while also touching on issues of bravery, friendship, and dealing humanely with refugees against a backdrop of an action-packed fantasy adventure.

"Tamora Pierce's books shaped me not only as a young writer but also as a young woman. She is a pillar, an icon, and an inspiration. Cracking open one of her marvelous novels always feels like coming home."
SARAH J. MAAS, #1 New York Times bestselling author

"Tamora Pierce didn't just blaze a trail. Her heroines cut a swath through the fantasy world with wit, strength, and savvy. Her stories still lead the vanguard today. Pierce is the real lioness, and we're all just running to keep pace."
LEIGH BARDUGO, #1 New York Times bestselling author
TAMORA PIERCE is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of over eighteen novels set in the fantasy realm of Tortall. She first captured the imagination of readers with her debut novel, Alanna: The First Adventure. Since then, her bestselling and award-winning titles have pushed the boundaries of fantasy and young adult novels to intr...
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Title:Squire: Book 3 Of The Protector Of The Small QuartetFormat:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 8.25 × 5.5 × 0.91 inPublished:August 24, 2004Publisher:Random House Children's BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0375829067

ISBN - 13:9780375829062

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Empowering This is such a fun book, I love the fantasy elements and that Kel is strong without magic. Another great one from Tamora Pierce!
Date published: 2018-01-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Coming of Age I read this series as a kid and admired Kel so much for her strength and gall. A great read for a young person.
Date published: 2016-12-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Love it This is a great book! The description of tournaments are great, and pretty accurate! I love it when authors do research to enhance their books.
Date published: 2016-12-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Just keeps getting better I love reading about Kel's adventures and how her story is so different from Alanna's.
Date published: 2016-12-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Adventure! A world in which women can be knighted! How can it get any better than that? Oh, it can, Kel is the best role model for a young girl and the world is so well built! Read it.
Date published: 2016-12-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Best Book in the Series This book was great! I think it's the most enjoyable out of all the others, and it's a fun read the entire time. We got introduced to a new cast of characters and even got to see a few familiar faces, but the best part was seeing Kel learn new skills and become even more worthy of becoming a knight. Raoul may perhaps be my new favourite character. The beginning of the book, showing him taking on Kel as his squire was a great introduction to his character and to the book, and he was a fun person to read about the entire time. His aversion to parties and ladies of marriageable age is a great quirk, and he is also honourable and kind and that really made him my favourite character. I didn't particularly enjoy how Kel's romance was handled in this book, however, and it's a problem I always have with young adult fiction. Her relationship with Cleon felt forced; I would've preferred her being someone else's lover, like Neal's, if only because of the feelings she got. It may seem like infatuation, but she also had other reasons to like her friend. With her current lover, it felt like she only liked being with him because he gave her attention and like the way he kissed or the way his hands felt on her body. The way potential sex was treated was also bad - and this is done in a way I've often found in YA. Kel loses herself in the moment, and it isn't until something jars her out of it that she regains her sense - and that lack of responsibility for the moment has always irked me. It makes both people involved blameless for any actions that could take place, and that's not something that should be planted in the heads of teenagers - but it so often is. Kel is a smart girl, and to have her swept away like that cheapened her character and her relationship. The way Kel's leadership nature grew was explored well in this book, and we got to see her develop nicely amongst the King's Own. Every adventure was exciting, and it was great to see her so absorbed in her duty that her Ordeal wasn't too often on her mind. Her obstacles about being a female gaining knighthood were also finally explored well here, and it was great to have good role models helping her along the way. I didn't like the ending very much, though, although it is a continuation of how the other books ended. They also always stop too abruptly for me, but the ending of this one was still satisfactory and I was able to jump into the next one quickly enough to keep exploring Kel's story. Because of the characters and the adventures in this story, it definitely makes this the most exciting book in the series and I'd absolutely reread this book even right after having just finished it. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Action Packed! Kel's life takes a huge leap forward, now that she has completed her (unfair and sexist) probationary period and is now a fully fledged page. This book takes Kel to new challenges and new experiences, as she blooms both as a page and as a young woman. We meet her new maid, Lalasa, a pretty but timid young woman who finds herself the cruel target of salacious interest among the older pages. Kel is quick to protect Lalasa but also begins teaching her self-defense. This hints at where Kel's strengths lie: in protecting the weak and teaching. Kel proves to be patient, observant and an effective leader. I loved reading her growth as a page and young woman. A very interesting and lively development in Kel's journey.
Date published: 2016-01-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Awesome My favorite of this quartet.
Date published: 2013-05-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Best! Tamora Pierce is the most talented author I have read a book by! She captivates the reader in a single sentence! I have re-read her books at least (at least) five times-Keep coming Tortall!
Date published: 2004-11-22

Read from the Book

Despite the overflow of humanity present for the congress at the royal palace, the hall where Keladry of Mimdelan walked was deserted. There were no servants to be seen. No echo of the footsteps, laughter, or talk that filled the sprawling residence sounded here, only Kel's steps and the click of her dog's claws on the stone floor. They made an interesting pair. The fourteen-year-old girl was big for her age, five feet nine inches tall, and dressed informally in breeches and shirt. Both were a dark green that emphasized the same color in her green-hazel eyes. Her dark boots were comfortable, not fashionable. On her belt hung a pouch and a black-hilted dagger in a plain black sheath. Her brown hair was cut to earlobe length. It framed a tanned face dusted with freckles across a delicate nose. Her mouth was full and decided. The dog, known as Jump, was barrel-chested, with slightly bowed forelegs. His small, triangular eyes were set deep in a head shaped like a heavy chisel. He was mostly white, but black splotches covered the end of his nose, his lone whole ear, and his rump; his tail plainly had been broken twice. He looked like a battered foot soldier to Kel's young squire, and he had proved his combat skills often. At the end of the hall stood a pair of wooden doors carved with a sun, the symbol of Mithros, god of law and war. They were ancient, the surfaces around the sun curved deep after centuries of polishing. Their handles were crude iron, as coarse as the fittings on a barn door. Kel stopped. Of the pages who had just passed the great examinations to become squires, she was the only one who had not come here before. Pages never came to this hall. Legend held that pages who visited the Chapel of the Ordeal never became squires: they were disgraced or killed. But once they were squires, the temptation to see the place where they would be tested on their fitness for knighthood was irresistible. Kel reached for the handle, and opened one door just enough to admit her and Jump. There were benches placed on either side of the room from the door to the altar. Kel slid onto one, glad to give her wobbly knees a rest. Jump sat in the aisle beside her. After her heart calmed, Kel inspected her surroundings. This chapel, focus of so many longings, was plain. The floor was gray stone flags; the benches were polished wood without ornament. Windows set high in the walls on either side were as stark as the room itself. Ahead was the altar. Here, at least, was decoration: gold candlesticks and an altar cloth that looked like gold chain mail. The sun disk on the wall behind it was also gold. Against the gray stone, the dark benches, and the wrought-iron cressets on the walls, the gold looked tawdry. The iron door to the right of the sun disk drew Kel's eyes. There was the Chamber of the Ordeal. Generations of squires had entered it to experience something. None told what they saw; they were forbidden to speak of it. Whatever it was, it usually let squires return to the chapel to be knighted. Some who entered the Chamber failed. A year-mate of Kel's brother Anders had died three weeks after his Ordeal without ever speaking. Two years after that a squire from Fief Yanholm left the Chamber, refused his shield, and fled, never to be seen again. At Midwinter in 453, months before the Immortals War broke out, a squire went mad there. Five months later he escaped his family and drowned himself ”The Chamber is like a cutter of gemstones," Anders had told Kel once. "It looks for your flaws and hammers them, till you crack open. And that's all I-or anyone will say about it." The iron door seemed almost separate from the wall, more real than its surroundings. Kel got to her feet, hesitated, then went to it. Standing before the door, she felt a cold draft. Kel wet suddenly dry lips with her tongue. Jump whined. "I know what I'm doing,” she told her dog without conviction, and set her palm on the door. She sat at a desk, stacks of Parchment on either side. Her hands sharpened a goose quill with a penknife. Splotches of ink stained her fingers. Even her sleeves were spotted with "There you are, squire." Kel looked up. Before her stood Sir Gareth the Younger, King Jonathan's friend and adviser. Like Kel's, his hands and sleeves were ink-stained. “I need you to find these.” He passed a slate to Kel, who took it, her throat tight with misery. "Before you finish up today, please. They should be in section eighty-eight." He pointed to the far end of the room. She saw shelves, all stretching from floor to ceiling, al lstuffed with books, scrolls, and documents. She looked at her tunic. She wore the badge Fief Naxen, Sir Gareth's home, with the white ring around it that indicated she served the heir to the fief. Her knight-master was a desk knight, not a warrior. Work is work, she thought, trying not to cry. She still had her duty to Sir Gareth, even if it meant grubbing through papers. She thrust herself away ftom her desk--and tottered on the chapel's flagstones. Her hands were numb with cold, her palms bright red where they had touched the Chamber door. Kel scowled at the iron door. "I'll do my duty," she told the thing, shivering. Jump whined again. He peered up at her, his tail awag in consolation. "I'm all right," Kel reassured him, but she checked her hands for inkspots. The Chamber had made her live the thing she feared most just now, when no field knight had asked for her service. What if the Chamber knew? What if she was to spend the next four years copying out dry passages from drier records? Would she quit? Would paperwork do what other pages' hostility had not-drive her back to Mindelan?

Editorial Reviews

“Tamora Pierce creates epic worlds populated by girls and women of bravery, heart, and strength. Her work inspired a generation of writers and continues to inspire us.” —HOLLY BLACK, #1 New York Times bestselling author“Few authors can slay so effectively with a single sentence—I mean fist-in-the-air, shouting-at-my-book slay—as Tamora Pierce. All these years later, I still draw strength from her words.” —MARIE LU, #1 New York Times bestselling author “Tamora Pierce is a seminal figure in the fantasy field of writing, turning out one terrific book after another.” —TERRY BROOKS, New York Times bestselling author of the Sword of Shannara trilogy“It’s impossible to overstate Tamora Pierce’s impact on children’s literature. Her tough, wise, and wonderful heroines have inspired generations of readers.” —RAE CARSON, New York Times bestselling author “In the world of YA fantasy, there’s before Tamora Pierce, and then after her female heroes started kicking down the doors (and walls, and other barriers)!” —BRUCE COVILLE, New York Times bestselling author “Tamora Pierce is a trailblazer for so many fantasy writers, hacking through the old tropes with her narrative machete and showing us that girl-centered adventures are not just possible but amazing.” —RACHEL HARTMAN, New York Times bestselling author “Tamora Pierce’s writing is like water from the swiftest, most refreshingly clear, invigorating, and revitalizing river.” —GARTH NIX, New York Times bestselling author“Tamora Pierce is gloriously unafraid to give her readers joy and laughter along with adventure and struggle, to let us love her characters wholeheartedly and find the best of ourselves in them.” —NAOMI NOVIK, New York Times bestselling author “Tamora Pierce and her brilliant heroines didn’t just break down barriers; they smashed them with magical fire.” —KATHERINE ARDEN, author of The Bear and the Nightingale “Tamora Pierce’s bold, courageous heroines illuminate the journey to womanhood.” —CALLIE BATES, author of The Waking Land “Tamora Pierce is the queen of YA fantasy, and we are all happy subjects in her court.” —JESSICA CLUESS, author of A Shadow Bright and Burning “Tamora Pierce’s novels gave me a different way of seeing the world. They were like nothing I’d encountered before. Alanna stormed her way into my thirteen-year-old heart and told me that I could write gorgeous, complicated novels about vibrantly real people in fantastic situations, and to be honest, she’s never left.” —ALAYA DAWN JOHNSON, award-winning author of Love Is the Drug