Stability Without Statehood: Lessons From Europe's History Before The Sovereign State

Hardcover | June 15, 2011

byPeter Haldén

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This book reinterprets the EU using classical and early modern republican political theory. Bypassing the nation-state, it presents a new theory of the creation, change and demise of organizations in world politics. It also argues that the state is a problematic solution to 'state-failure' and explores alternative republican commonwealths.

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This book reinterprets the EU using classical and early modern republican political theory. Bypassing the nation-state, it presents a new theory of the creation, change and demise of organizations in world politics. It also argues that the state is a problematic solution to 'state-failure' and explores alternative republican commonweal...

PETER HALDÉN is a researcher at the University of Helsinki, Finland. Previously, he worked at the Swedish Defence Research Agency and studied at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy. His previous works include an edited translation of the Peace of Westphalia and The Geopolitics of Climate Change.

other books by Peter Haldén

Format:HardcoverDimensions:240 pages, 8.87 × 5.78 × 0.9 inPublished:June 15, 2011Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230273556

ISBN - 13:9780230273559

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Through the Shadows of the State
The Fiction of the State as the Good, Natural and the Beautiful
Remedies: The Neglected Heritage of Republicanism
A Long-lived Republic: The Holy Roman Empire 1648-1763
A Solitary Republic: The United States of America 1776-1865
A Shielded Republic: The European Union 1957-2010
Republican Commonwealths versus State-Building
Conclusions