Staging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern Drama by Wendy WallStaging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern Drama by Wendy Wall

Staging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern Drama

byWendy WallEditorStephen Orgel

Paperback | November 2, 2006

Pricing and Purchase Info

$79.21

Earn 396 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

Wendy Wall argues that representations of housework in the early modern period helped to forge conceptions of national identity. With a detailed account of household practices, this study interprets plays on the London stage in reference to the first printed cookbooks in England. Working from original historical sources, Wall reveals that domesticity was represented as "familiar" as well as "exotic". She analyzes a wide range of plays including some now little-known as well as key works of the early modern period.
Wendy Wall is Associate Professor of English Literature at Northwestern University and a scholar of early modern literature and culture. She is the author of The Imprint of Gender: Authorship and Publication in the English Renaissance (Cornell University Press, 1993) and co-editor of the journal Renaissance Drama. Wall has published wi...
Title:Staging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern DramaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:308 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:November 2, 2006Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052103003X

ISBN - 13:9780521030038

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Staging Domesticity: Household Work and English Identity in Early Modern Drama

Reviews

Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction: in the nations' kitchen; 1. Familiarity and pleasure in the English household guide, 1500-1700; 2. Needles and birches: pedagogy, domesticity, and the advent of English comedy; 3. Why does Puck sweep? Shakespearean fairies and the politics of cleaning; 4. The erotics of milk and live food, or, ingesting early modern Englishness; 5. Tending to bodies and boys: queer physic in Knight of the Burning Pestle; 6. Blood in the kitchen: service, taste, and violence in domestic drama; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"In a beautifully sustained argument, Wall offers powerful, detailed renderings of household practices ... and equally intriguing interpretations of the emergence of the household in drama identifying itself as 'English'.... Essential for libraries serving graduate students and researchers." Choice