Stay Where You Are And Then Leave

Hardcover | March 25, 2014

byJohn Boyne

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From the author of the phenomenally bestselling The Boy in the Striped Pajamas comes an unforgettable story of a boy's life changed by war, published to coincide with World War One's centenary.
     The day the First World War broke out, Alfie Summerfield's father promised he wouldn't go away to fight -- but he broke that promise the following day. Four years later, Alfie doesn't know where his father might be, other than that he's away on a special, secret mission.
     Then, while shining shoes at King's Cross Station, Alfie unexpectedly sees his father's name -- on a sheaf of papers belonging to a military doctor. Bewildered and confused, Alfie realises his father is in a hospital close by -- a hospital treating soldiers with an unusual condition. Alfie is determined to rescue his father from this strange, unnerving place...

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From the Publisher

From the author of the phenomenally bestselling The Boy in the Striped Pajamas comes an unforgettable story of a boy's life changed by war, published to coincide with World War One's centenary.      The day the First World War broke out, Alfie Summerfield's father promised he wouldn't go away to fight -- but he broke that promise the f...

JOHN BOYNE was born in Ireland in 1971 and is the author of six novels for adults. His first novel for children, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, won two Irish book awards, was shortlisted for the British Book Award, reached the top spot on the New York Times bestseller list, and has been made into a film. His novels are published in mo...

other books by John Boyne

The Boy In The Striped Pajamas
The Boy In The Striped Pajamas

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The Boy At The Top Of The Mountain
The Boy At The Top Of The Mountain

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The Boy In The Striped Pajamas (deluxe Illustrated Edition)
The Boy In The Striped Pajamas (deluxe Illustrated Edit...

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see all books by John Boyne
Format:HardcoverDimensions:256 pages, 8.53 × 5.68 × 0.96 inPublished:March 25, 2014Publisher:PRH Canada Young ReadersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0385681399

ISBN - 13:9780385681391

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Customer Reviews of Stay Where You Are And Then Leave

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from 3.5 Stars This was much better than I expected. It was a nice peek into WWI through the eyes of a child and the best part was that it didn't dumb down any important aspects. While children wouldn't get everything that this novel manages to show about life in England during that time, as an adult there is so much you can learn from this and take away from each character's experience. The book was clearly well researched and it hit so many good points. I'm glad I finally got around to reading it even though the experience (through a child's eye) didn't entirely appeal to me. This really got me fired up. In modern times, at least here, we don't have the same blind love for our country and the same ignorance about the trials of war on everyone involved. It got me so angry to see the poor conchie getting abused for his beliefs, men that haven't signed up yet - or were mistook for them - getting white feathers, and the population not understand just how bad an effect on the soldiers combat had. It really got me riled up and I feel like no children would fully be able to grasp these concepts and how important they are to keep in mind with how society has progressed since then. At least the book was simplistic in its scope. Through a young narrator we don't have to deal directly with the issues, we just have to see them unfold around him. We can understand the problems without having him do anything about it. But perhaps him not taking action in the same way one is used to in novels for an older audience is what bothered me. What the main character did do, though, was at least interesting enough to drive the plot but it was still too simplistic. I also found it a bit difficult to believe that he could shine shoes, as a complete beginner, well enough to make money and more so that he was able to run off with <spoiler>his dad,</spoiler> a patient from a fully operational hospital. Him making a pretty good recovery at the end was very unbelievable, as well. I don't believe the author treated mental illness as well as he could have, but at least it brought light to it. It just felt like a child's solution to the problem and considering how grown up so much of the material in this book is it fell so flat. For a clever child this book would do very well, though, and even adults should read it to remind themselves of the events of the past and how far we still have to go. It really does provide food for thought and stirs up so many passionate feelings with all the subject matter that it does touch on and because of that I think it would make for great reading material for people of all ages. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Review from Book Nerd Canada Alfie and his family live a pretty uneventful life. All he wants to do is ride the milk float with his father. Then his father does something that changes their life forever. He volunteers to be in the war. This setting is probably what interested me in the most. If you know about "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas", you'll know I pretty much cried when I saw the movie. So naturally I had to pick this one up. I liked reading about their daily lives. So simple, and so rewarding at the same time. Not a lot of problems until Alfie's father goes off to war. Alfie had to do something to help. He was determined to help his mom by keeping his job from her.I admired his courage and his determination for his secret mission to be achieved, helping his dad. Then the end result where it nearly traumatizes him. Then letters that his mother received, she hid them From Alfie. There were so many secrets. From both sides. And keeping secrets means they're protecting one another, but yikes I wanted to just shake them. A lot more happy things could have happened if they just told each other the truth. His friendship with his best friend was all and good, but there were no development there at all. I liked the little details like the stories that he would listen to while he would shine his customer's shoes. Even having the Prime Minister there and not realizing it was him. The writing is written in a no nonsense way. Very straight forward and told in a child's voice, "Stay Where You Are and Then Leave" will have you hugging your family and telling them you love them so!
Date published: 2016-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Well-written and spot on to it's theme, I really felt the emotion and strength This book touched a chord with me. Although it takes place in World War I, I felt memories return to me at the same age as Alfie; mine from World War II. John Boyne is spot on with this story and has a fantastic ability to recreate this time period and the horrors that went with it, without losing sight of his youthful audience. This book is suggested for the 9 to 12 year range, but I believe it would be interesting to a wider range. Alfie is an only child and has just had his fifth birthday as the story begins. This is his story, but also the story of all London where suddenly all the Dads are off to war, Mothers off to work and/or taking in work and children left alone. Alfie's best friend Kalena Janacek and her father have been sent away to the Isle of Wight to an internment camp, his Dad Georgie is at war and his Dad's best friend Joe as a conscientious objector, a conchie as they call him, is dragged off to jail and badly beaten. All life as he knew it is changed, and changed him with it. Alfie decides he should do his part, too, so he takes Mr. Janacek's shoeshine kit and starts working at the train station, skipping school three days a week. This is a tale of survival, constant fear and worry, death, innovation and love of family. When letters no longer come from Georgie, Alfie's father, he believes the worst. His mother tries to ease his fears by telling him he can't write because he is on a secret mission but Alfie doesn't believe her. Chance is a strange thing. While Alfie, now nine, is shining the shoes of a well-dressed man at the station, a wind happens to gust through the station and catch all the papers the man is holding. Alfie rushes to collect them all and chances to see his father listed as a patient at a hospital in England. From this point on the story veers as Alfie plots to see his father. This story is very well-written, compelling and compassionate, as much as a coming of age story. Alfie's complicated plans are admirable if ill-conceived. In a four year period, many things can change, and especially with children, who always seem to grow up too soon, but during war often become grown up through necessity as Alfie did. With love, though, anything is possible. This book touched a chord with me. Although it takes place in World War I, I felt memories return to me at the same age as Alfie; mine from World War II. John Boyne is spot on with this story and has a fantastic ability to recreate this time period and the horrors that went with it, without losing sight of his youthful audience. This book is suggested for the 9 to 12 year range, but I believe it would be interesting to a wider range. Alfie is an only child and has just had his fifth birthday as the story begins. This is his story, but also the story of all London where suddenly all the Dads are off to war, Mothers off to work and/or taking in work and children left alone. Alfie's best friend Kalena Janacek and her father have been sent away to the Isle of Wight to an internment camp, his Dad Georgie is at war and his Dad's best friend Joe as a conscientious objector, a conchie as they call him, is dragged off to jail and badly beaten. All life as he knew it is changed, and changed him with it. Alfie decides he should do his part, too, so he takes Mr. Janacek's shoeshine kit and starts working at the train station, skipping school three days a week. This is a tale of survival, constant fear and worry, death, innovation and love of family. When letters no longer come from Georgie, Alfie's father, he believes the worst. His mother tries to ease his fears by telling him he can't write because he is on a secret mission but Alfie doesn't believe her. Chance is a strange thing. While Alfie, now nine, is shining the shoes of a well-dressed man at the station, a wind happens to gust through the station and catch all the papers the man is holding. Alfie rushes to collect them all and chances to see his father listed as a patient at a hospital in England. From this point on the story veers as Alfie plots to see his father. This story is very well-written, compelling and compassionate, as much as a coming of age story. Alfie's complicated plans are admirable if ill-conceived. In a four year period, many things can change, and especially with children, who always seem to grow up too soon, but during war often become grown up through necessity as Alfie did. With love, though, anything is possible. I received this book in exchange for an honest review. The review and rating are based on my own perception. I received this book in exchange for an honest review. The review and rating are based on my own perception.
Date published: 2014-06-14

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Editorial Reviews

“John Boyne is very much in touch with his childish side with the capable way he writes and thinks like a child. . . both entertaining and touching.”
The Guardian