Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom RobbinsStill Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins

Still Life with Woodpecker

byTom Robbins

Paperback | April 1, 1990

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Still Life with Woodpecker is a sort of a love story that takes place inside a pack of Camel cigarettes. It reveals the purpose of the moon, explains the difference between criminals and outlaws, examines the conflict between social activism and romantic individualism, and paints a portrait of contemporary society that includes powerful Arabs, exiled royalty, and pregnant cheerleaders. It also deals with the problem of redheads.
Tom Robbins has been called “a vital natural resource” by The Oregonian, “one of the wildest and most entertaining novelists in the world” by the Financial Times of London, and “the most dangerous writer in the world today” by Fernanda Pivano of Italy’s Corriere della Sera. A Southerner by birth, Robbins has lived in and around Seattle...
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Title:Still Life with WoodpeckerFormat:PaperbackDimensions:288 pages, 8.2 × 5.2 × 0.58 inPublished:April 1, 1990Publisher:Random House Publishing Group

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0553348973

ISBN - 13:9780553348972

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Customer Reviews of Still Life with Woodpecker

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Best Kind of Absurd This is a book like nothing I'd read before. A tortuous, unpredictable plot carried forth by a bizarre cast of characters makes this one tough to put down—and you'll be happy you didn't.
Date published: 2017-04-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Still Life with Woodpecker I have read it a couple times, and love it even more each time.
Date published: 2017-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Tom is always an inspiration!
Date published: 2014-04-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Of Outlaws and Redheads This must have been the most amazing book i have ever read! i, being a natural redhead thoroughly enjoyed Robbins philosophies on us! great book!
Date published: 2004-09-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from about love and the mystery of I first read this book 20 years ago and immediately rushed out and bought extra copies to give or lend to friends. It's the perfect book. I especially remember the message that I was left with that some things, like love, should remain mysterious, because if we succeed in trying to solve the mystery, it will fly out the window and be gone.
Date published: 2001-03-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of Robbins' Best! Funny, thoughtful and copiously humourous are only a few superlatives that can used to describe this book. The second Tom Robbins book that I have read, it was enjoyable from cover to cover, detailing the exploits of Princess Leigh-Cheri and her later adventures with The Woodpecker. The story particularly had a strong start, with ample context provided by describing the "royal family" and specifically, Max and his quirks. Robbins use of simile and metaphor is masterful, and he is able to weave an account with such accuracy and minute detail that the reader cannot help but be impressed. The Woodpecker character (aka Bernard Wrangle) is both funny and tragic. With outlaws such as these, who needs friends?
Date published: 2000-11-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Hourray For Redheads Just one word to describe this book: FUNNY!!
Date published: 2000-10-08
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Very interesting This was my first Tom Robbins book that I was able to finish reading. I tried "SKinny Legs and All" but found it a bit too obscure. "Still life with Woodpecker" was wacky but at least its plot is easy to follow. Tom Robbins is definitely a philosopher. Tells the story of an exiled princess and her quest for purpose.
Date published: 2000-06-21

Read from the Book

If this typewriter can't do it, then fuck it, it can't be done.This is the all-new Remington SL3, the machine that answers the question, "Which is harder, trying to read The Brothers Karamazov while listening to Stevie Wonder records or hunting for Easter eggs on a typewriter keyboard?"  This is the cherry on top of the cowgirl.  The burger served by the genius waitress.  The Empress card.I sense that the novel of my dreams is in the Remington SL3--although it writes much faster than I can spell.  And no matter that my typing finger was pinched last week by a giant land crab.  This baby speaks electric Shakespeare at the slightest provocation and will rap out a page and a half if you just look at it hard."What are you looking for in a typewriter?" the salesman asked."Something more than words, " I replied.  "Crystals.  I want to send my reader armloads of crystals, some of which are the colors of orchids and peonies, some of which pick up radio signals from a secret city that is half Paris and half Coney Island."He recommended the Remington SL3.My old typewriter was named Olivetti.  I know an extraordinary juggler named Olivetti.  No relation.  There is, however, a similarity between juggling and composing on my typewriter.  The trick is, when you spill something, make it look like part of the act.I have in my cupboard, under lock and key, the last bottle of Anais Nin (green label) to be smuggled out of Punta del Visionario before the revolution.  Tonight, I'll pull the cork.  I'll inject 10 cc. into a ripe lime, the way natives do.  I'll suck.  And begin--If this typewriter can't do it, I'll swear it can't be done.

From Our Editors

One of Robbins most popular novels, this is a sort of love story that takes place inside a pack of Camel cigarettes. It reveals the purpose of the moon, explains the difference between criminals and outlaws, and paints a portrait of contemporary society that includes powerful Arabs, exiled royalty, and pregnant cheerleaders. It also deals with the problem of redheads

Editorial Reviews

“Robbins’s comic philosophical musings reveal a flamboyant genius.—People