Stoicism, Politics and Literature in the Age of Milton: War and Peace Reconciled by Andrew ShifflettStoicism, Politics and Literature in the Age of Milton: War and Peace Reconciled by Andrew Shifflett

Stoicism, Politics and Literature in the Age of Milton: War and Peace Reconciled

byAndrew Shifflett

Paperback | February 12, 2009

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This book offers a fresh examination of key seventeenth-century writers--notably Andrew Marvell, Katherine Philips and John Milton--in the context of their common interest in the republican, libertarian and oppositional potential of the philosophical tradition of Stoicism. As a study of the rhetorical and philosophical bases of English neostoicism, this book sketches an important new map of political discourse in the civil war period.

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Title:Stoicism, Politics and Literature in the Age of Milton: War and Peace ReconciledFormat:PaperbackDimensions:188 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.43 inPublished:February 12, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052110114X

ISBN - 13:9780521101141

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Conflict and constancy in seventeenth-century England; 2. Andrew Marvell: the Stoicism of nature, war and work; 3. Katherine Philips: the Stoicism of hatred and forgiveness; 4. Jonson, Marvell, Milton: the Stoicism of friendship and imitation; 5. John Milton: the Stoicism of history and providence; Notes; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"Stoicism, Politics, and Literature in the Age of Milton is a strong addition to seventeenth-century studies. This relatively slim volume offers a fresh understanding of Stoicism that has the potential to illuminate many more literary texts than are actually discussed here." Modern Philology