Strange New Land: African Americans 1617-1776

Hardcover | June 1, 1990

byPeter Wood, Robin D. G. Kelley, Earl Lewis

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Strange New Land explores the history of slavery and the black struggle for freedom before the U.S. became a nation. Beginning with the colonization of North America, this book documents the transformation of slavery from a more brutal form of indentured servitude to a full blown system of racial domination. It focuses on how Africans survived the process and how they shaped the contours of American racial slavery.

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Strange New Land explores the history of slavery and the black struggle for freedom before the U.S. became a nation. Beginning with the colonization of North America, this book documents the transformation of slavery from a more brutal form of indentured servitude to a full blown system of racial domination. It focuses on how Africa...

About the Author: Peter H. Wood is a professor of history at Duke University. Dr. Wood is the author of Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial south Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion, which was nominated for the National Book Award.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:128 pages, 9.25 × 7.5 × 0.98 inPublished:June 1, 1990Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195087003

ISBN - 13:9780195087000

Appropriate for ages: 10 - adult

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Editorial Reviews

"While his selection of facts and figures is illuminating throughout, what makes the work a particular pleasure are Wood's inspired discussions; he ably links facts and puts them into larger contexts for readers. An obscure chapter in American history, rendered vividly."--Kirkus Reviews