Strange Phenomena in Convex and Discrete Geometry

Paperback | June 25, 1996

byChuanming Zong

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Convex and discrete geometry is one of the most intuitive subjects in mathematics. One can explain many of its problems, even the most difficult - such as the sphere-packing problem (what is the densest possible arrangement of spheres in an n-dimensional space?) and the Borsuk problem (is it possible to partition any bounded set in an n-dimensional space into n+1 subsets, each of which is strictly smaller in "extent" than the full set?) - in terms that a layman can understand; and one can reasonably make conjectures about their solutions with little training in mathematics.

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From Our Editors

This book presents some of the most famous problems of convex and discrete geometry - such as Borsuk's problem (is it possible to partition any bounded set in an n-dimensional Euclidean space into n+1 subsets, each of which is strictly smaller in diameter than the full set?) and the finite sphere-packing problem (how can one arrange m ...

From the Publisher

Convex and discrete geometry is one of the most intuitive subjects in mathematics. One can explain many of its problems, even the most difficult - such as the sphere-packing problem (what is the densest possible arrangement of spheres in an n-dimensional space?) and the Borsuk problem (is it possible to partition any bounded set in an ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:164 pages, 9.25 × 6.1 × 0.27 inPublished:June 25, 1996Publisher:Springer New York

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387947345

ISBN - 13:9780387947341

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From Our Editors

This book presents some of the most famous problems of convex and discrete geometry - such as Borsuk's problem (is it possible to partition any bounded set in an n-dimensional Euclidean space into n+1 subsets, each of which is strictly smaller in diameter than the full set?) and the finite sphere-packing problem (how can one arrange m nonoverlapping congruent spheres in an n-dimensional Euclidean space to minimize the volume or surface area of their convex hull?) - as well as their (at times astonishing) answers. Though covering some of the most recent developments in the field, the book is self-contained, and can be understood by any trained mathematician.