Strategies For Successful Writing

Paperback | January 4, 2016

byJames A. Reinking, Robert A. Von Der Osten

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For first-year courses in Composition/Rhetoric.

 

A four-in-one guide for writing in the modes—a rhetoric, research guide, reader, and handbook

At every step of the writing process, Strategies for Successful Writing supports students as they learn to compose in the rhetorical modes. Over 100 short examples demonstrate writing concepts and strategies, so that they can recognize them more easily in the longer reading selections and apply them in their own compositions. Instruction is kept brief and to the point, so that students spend more time writing and less time reading about writing. Perfect for those seeking support for participating in academic discourse for the first time, this four-in-one guide may be the only text students will need for the composition course.


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For first-year courses in Composition/Rhetoric.   A four-in-one guide for writing in the modes—a rhetoric, research guide, reader, and handbook At every step of the writing process, Strategies for Successful Writing supports students as they learn to compose in the rhetorical modes. Over 100 short examples demonstrate writing ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:688 pages, 8.9 × 7.3 × 0.9 inPublished:January 4, 2016Publisher:Pearson EducationLanguage:English

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ISBN - 10:013411924X

ISBN - 13:9780134119243

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Table of Contents

RHETORIC   


1 . Writing: A First Look  

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

1.1 Establish the purpose for your writing.

1.2 Determine the audience for your writing.

1.3 Identify the qualities of good writing.

1.4 Employ techniques to think critically about your writing.

1.5 Apply writing techniques for multimedia.

1.6 Write ethically and avoid plagiarism.

The Purposes of Writing  

“Turn Down Your iPod Volume (or Go Deaf)” by Marianne Halavage

The Audience for Your Writing  

The Qualities of Good Writing 

Writing and Critical Thinking

Writing in a Multimedia World

Writing and Ethics

 

2. Strategies for Successful and Critical Reading 

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

2.1 Read for different purposes.

2.2 Employ different strategies for a first and second reading.

2.3 Overcome reading challenges.

2.4 Read critically by employing critical-thinking skills.

2.5 Use reading techniques to develop your writing.

2.6 Write a summary.

2.7 Write a critique.

Orienting Your Reading

Strategies for Reading and Rereading

Mastering Reading Problems 

Reading to Critique: Reading Critically

Reading as a Writer

“The Appeal of the Androgynous Man” by Amy Gross

Writing a Summary

Writing a Critique

 

3. Planning and Drafting Your Paper: Exploration 

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

3.1 Analyze the assignment to understand its goals.

3.2 Use different strategies to find and develop a topic.

3.3 Gather information to support your topic.

3.4 Think critically about your topic.

3.5 Organize and outline your paper.

3.6 Develop an effective thesis statement.

3.7 Write a first draft of your paper.

Understanding the Assignment 

Zeroing in on a Topic 

Gathering Information 

Thinking Critically about Your Topic

Organizing the Information

Developing a Thesis Statement

Writing the First Draft

 

4. Revising and Editing Your Paper: Courageous Transformations

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

4.1 Approach your writing to effectively revise.

4.2 Use the F.A.C.T. strategy to guide your revision.

4.3 Think critically about your draft.

4.4 Revise at the paragraph and sentence level.

4.5 Write the introduction, conclusion, and title.

4.6 Participate in peer evaluation and use peer responses in your own revision.

4.7 Write collaboratively with others using multimedia.

4.8 Assemble and maintain a portfolio of your writing.

Preparing to Revise 

Considering the Whole Essay

Thinking Critically about Your Draft

Strengthening Paragraphs and Sentences

Writing the Introduction, Conclusion, and Title

Peer Evaluation of Drafts

Collaborative Writing

Maintaining and Reviewing a Portfolio

 

5. Paragraphs

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

5.1 Create effective paragraphs that have unity.

5.2 Apply different strategies for the placement of topic sentences.

5.3 Write paragraphs that are well developed.

5.4 Use a variety of paragraph organizational patterns.

5.5 Achieve coherence in your paragraphs.

5.6 Write introduction, transition, and conclusion paragraphs using a variety of strategies.

Unity

The Topic Sentence

Adequate Development

Organization

Coherence

Paragraphs with Special Functions: Introductions, Transitions, Conclusions

 

6. Effective Sentences

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

6.1 Write sentences that avoid unnecessary wordiness.

6.2 Write sentences that vary in complexity and length.

6.3 Vary the word order of sentences.

6.4 Vary the positioning of movable modifiers.

6.5 Use parallelism to present equivalent ideas.

6.6 Choose the right verb voice for your sentences.

Avoiding Unnecessary Wordiness

Varying Sentence Complexity and Length

Word Order in Independent Clauses

Positioning of Movable Modifiers

Using Parallelism

Choosing the Right Verb Voice

 

7. Achieving Effective Style and Tone Through Word Choice

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

7.1 Select the kinds of words that will have the most impact in your writing.

7.2 Use the best level of diction and tone for your writing situation.

7.3 Enhance your writing with figurative language and irony.

7.4 Avoid using flawed diction in your writing.

Selecting the Right Words

Achieving the Desired Rhetorical Effect

Special Stylistic Techniques: Figurative Language and Irony

Eliminating Flawed Diction

 

8 . Narration: Relating Events

In this chapter you will learn how to:

8.1 Use narrative as a writing strategy.

8.2 Develop and organize your narrative with action, conflict, and point of view.

8.3 Brainstorm the key events of your narrative.

8.4 Integrate dialogue into your narrative.

8.5 Think critically about your narrative.

8.6 Write so that your narrative is ethical.

8.7 Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your narrative.

8.8 Critically synthesize material from sources to create your narrative.

The Purpose of a Narrative

Action, Conflict, and Point of View

Key Events

Dialogue

Thinking Critically about Narratives

Ethical Issues

Writing a Narrative

Sample Student Essay of Narration:  

“Joy Through the Tears” by Brittany Coggin

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Narrative

 

9. Description: Presenting Impressions

In this chapter you will learn how to:

9.1 Use description as a writing strategy.

9.2 Use sensory perceptions to create a dominant impression.

9.3 Determine a vantage point for your description.

9.4 Select and arrange the details of your description.

9.5 Think critically about your description.

9.6 Write so that your description is ethical.

9.7 Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your description.

9.8 Critically synthesize source materials to create your description.

The Purpose of a Description

Sensory and Dominant Impressions

Vantage Point

Selection and Arrangement of Details

Thinking Critically about Descriptions

Ethical Issues

Writing a Description

Sample Student Essay of Description:

“My Serenity” by Rachel Harvey 

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Description

 

 

10. Process Analysis: Explaining How

In this chapter you will learn how to:

10.1 Use process analysis as a writing strategy.

10.2 Distinguish between processes that readers will or won’t perform.

10.3 Write a process in an electronic exchange such as e-mail or instant messaging.

10.4 Think critically about processes.

10.5 Write so that your process analysis is ethical.

10.6 Prewrite, plan, and draft your process analyses for readers who will perform them.

10.7 Prewrite, plan, and draft your process analyses for readers who won’t perform them.

10.8 Revise your process analysis.

10.9 Critically synthesize source materials to create your process analysis.

The Purpose of Process Analysis

Kinds of Process Analysis Papers

Writing Process Analysis in Electronic Communications

Thinking Critically about Process

Ethical Issues

Writing a Process Analysis for Readers Who Will Perform the Process

Writing a Process Analysis for Readers Who Will Not Perform the Process

Revising the Process Analysis

Sample Student Essay of Process Analysis:

“Basic Song Writing Techniques” by Hannah Hill

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Process Analysis

 

 

11. Illustration: Making Yourself Clear

In this chapter you will learn how to:

11.1    Use illustration as a writing strategy.

11.2    Select appropriate examples for your illustration.

11.3    Determine the best number of examples to use.

11.4    Organize the examples of your illustration.

11.5   Think critically about illustrations.

11.6    Write so that your illustration is ethical.

11.7    Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your illustration.

11.8   Critically synthesize source materials to create your illustration.

The Purpose of Illustration

Selecting Appropriate Examples  

Number of Examples  

Organizing the Examples  

Thinking Critically about Illustrations

Ethical Issues  

Writing an Illustration  

Sample Student Essay of Illustration:

“If It Is Worth Doing” by Janice Carlton  

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Illustration  

 

12.  Classification: Grouping into Categories  

In this chapter you will learn how to:

12.1    Use classification as a writing strategy.

12.2    Select categories for classification.

12.3    Determine the best number of categories.

12.4    Develop categories with specific details.

12.5   Think critically about classification.

12.6    Write so that your classification is ethical.

12.7    Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your classification.

12.8   Critically synthesize source materials to create your classification.

The Purpose of Classification

Selecting Categories  

Number of Categories  

Developing Categories  

Thinking Critically about Classification

Ethical Issues  

Writing a Classification  

Sample Student Essay of Classification:

“Types of Video Games for Children” by Kyra Glass  

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Classification

 

13.  Comparison: Showing Relationships  

In this chapter you will learn how to:

13.1    Use comparison as a writing strategy.

13.2    Select items for comparison.

13.3    Use details to develop a comparison.

13.4    Use different patterns to organize a comparison.

13.5   Use analogies in your comparison.

13.6   Think critically about comparisons and analogies.

13.7    Write so that your comparison is ethical.

13.8    Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your comparison.

13.9   Critically synthesize source materials to create your comparison.

The Purpose of Comparison

Selecting Items for Comparison  

Developing a Comparison  

Organizing a Comparison  

Using Analogy  

Thinking Critically about Comparisons and Analogies

Ethical Issues  

Writing a Comparison  

Sample Student Essay of Comparison:

“Differences between Korean and English” by Sunho Lee  

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Comparison

 

14.  Cause and Effect: Explaining Why  

In this chapter you will learn how to:

14.1   Use cause and effect as a writing strategy.

14.2   Select an organizational pattern for your causal analysis.

14.3   Avoid making reasoning errors about cause and effect.

14.4   Think critically about cause and effect.

14.5   Write so that your causal analysis is ethical.

14.6   Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your causal analysis.

14.7   Critically synthesize source materials to create your cause-and-effect essay.

The Purpose of Cause and Effect

Patterns in Causal Analysis  

Reasoning Errors in Causal Analysis  

Thinking Critically about Cause and Effect

Ethical Issues  

Writing a Causal Analysis  

Sample Student Essay of Cause and Effect:

“Why Students Drop Out of College” by Diann Fisher

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Cause and Effect



15.  Definition: Establishing Boundaries  

In this chapter you will learn how to:

15.1   Use definition as a writing strategy.

15.2   Develop synonyms and essential definitions.

15.3   Avoid common pitfalls of definition.

15.4   Employ various writing strategies to create extended definitions.

15.5   Think critically about definitions.

15.6   Write so that your definition is ethical.

15.7   Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your extended definition.

15.8   Critically synthesize source materials to create your definition.

The Purpose of Definition

Types of Definitions  

Pitfalls in Preparing Essential Definitions

Extended Definitions

Thinking Critically about Definitions

Ethical Issues  

Writing an Extended Definition  

Sample Student Essay of Definition:

“Vigilante Justice” by Heather Hornbrook

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Definition

 


16.  Argument: Convincing Others  

In this chapter you will learn how to:

16.1    Use argument as a writing strategy.

16.2   Frame an argument effectively.

16.3    Critically evaluate and use different kinds of claims and evidence.

16.4    Construct effective inductive and deductive arguments, and use analogy.

16.5    Use effective emotional appeals to persuade.

16.6   Use visual aids to support arguments.

16.7    Use effective ethical appeals to persuade.

16.8   Understand Rogerian and exploratory argument.

16.9    Recognize and avoid logical fallacies.

16.10 Think critically about argument.

16.11 Write so that your argument is ethical.

16.12 Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your argument.

16.13 Critically synthesize source materials to create your argument.

The Purpose of an Argument

Framing the Argument

The Rational Appeal  

Reasoning Strategies  

The Emotional Appeal  

Making Arguments with Visuals

The Ethical Appeal  

Other Types of Arguments: Rogerian and Exploratory Arguments

Ferreting Out Fallacies  

Thinking Critically about Arguments

Ethical Issues  

Writing an Argument  

Sample Student Essay of Argument:

“Bottled Troubled Water” by Scott Lemanski  

Critical Synthesis with Sources: Argument

 


17.  The Essay Examination

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

17.1    Study for an examination.

17.2    Analyze the types of test questions.

17.3    Prepare to write an exam essay by determining what is expected.

17.4    Write an effective essay for an exam.

Studying for the Examination

Types of Test Questions

Preparing to Write

Writing the Examination Answer



18.  Writing About Literature, Movies, and Television Shows

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

18.1   Identify the key elements of creative works.

18.2   Analyze and write about plot in creative works.

18.3   Analyze and write about setting in creative works.

18.4   Analyze and write about character in creative works.

18.5   Analyze and write about point of view in creative works.

18.6   Analyze and write about symbols in creative works.

18.7   Analyze and write about themes in creative works.

18.8   Analyze and write about other literary devices: memes, ambiguity, juxtaposition, and irony.

18.9   Write so that your literary analysis is ethical.

18.10 Prewrite, plan, draft, and revise your analysis of literature, movies, or television shows.

18.11 Write a review, explication, or literary analysis.

The Elements of Creative Works

Plot

Setting

Character

Point of View

Symbols

Theme

Other Literary Devices: Memes, Ambiguity, Juxtaposition, and Irony

Ethical Issues

The Writing Process: Writing about Literature, Movies, and Television

Writing a Review, Explication, or Literary Analysis

Sample Student literary Analysis:

“The Refrigerator: A Symbol Between Worlds in ‘Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters’” by Erin Mueller

 


RESEARCH GUIDE

19.  The Research Paper

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

19.1   Identify and use your library’s resources.

19.2   Select and narrow a research topic and brainstorm to create a research question.

19.3   Conduct research using an online catalog, databases, Internet searches, and other  sources.

19.4   Evaluate your sources, take notes using summary and paraphrase, and assemble a working bibliography.

19.5   Organize your notes to create an outline for a research paper.

19.6   Write so that your research paper is ethical.

19.7   Write a draft of your research paper, and include visuals to enhance your paper.

19.8   Avoid plagiarism by integrating your sources with proper internal documentation.

19.9   Integrate and synthesize sources.

19.10 Prepare a finished copy of your research paper.

19.11 Use a checklist to plan your research paper from start to finish.

Learning about Your Library

Choosing a Topic

Discovering Your Sources

Taking Notes

Organizing and Outlining

Ethical Issues

Writing Your Research Paper

Avoiding Plagiarism

Integrating and Synthesizing Sources

Preparing Your Finished Copy

Writing Your Research Paper Checklist

 


20.  Documenting Sources: MLA Style

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

20.1   Prepare papers using the MLA system.

20.2   Prepare bibliographic references using the MLA style.

20.3   Follow MLA style to cite sources in your essay.

20.4   Integrate and cite quotations using the MLA style.

MLA System for Preparing Papers

Preparing Proper MLA Bibliographic References

Handling In-Text Citations

Citing Quotations

Sample Student MLA RESEARCH PAPER:

“Fighting Ebola with Isolation and Quarantine” by Nilofar Khanbhai

 


21.  Documenting Sources: APA Style

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

21.1   Prepare papers using the APA system.

21.2   Prepare bibliographic references using the APA style.

21.3   Follow APA style to cite sources in your essay.

21.4   Integrate and cite quotations using the APA style.

APA System for Preparing Papers

Preparing Proper APA Bibliographic References

Handling In-Text Citations

Citing Quotations

Sample Student APA RESEARCH PAPER:

“HGTV: Building Not Just Homes but a Globally Successful Network” by Aubrey Cobb

 


22.  Additional Research Strategies: Interviews, Questionnaires, Direct Observations

In this chapter, you will learn how to:

22.1    Identify the value of primary research.

22.2    Apply the general principles for primary research.

22.3    Conduct primary research ethically.

22.4    Prepare for and conduct interviews, and write a report based on interviews.

22.5    Develop and administer questionnaires, and write a report based on the data.

22.6    Conduct direct observations and write a report based on the observations.

The Value of Primary Research

General Principles for Primary Research

Ethical Issues

Interviews

Sample Student Interview Report: “Budget Cuts Affect State Police: An Interview Report with Officer Robert Timmons” by Holly Swain

Questionnaires

Sample Student Questionnaire: “Survey on Public Smoking”

Sample Student Questionnaire Report: “Findings from Smoking Questionnaire Distributed to Bartram College Students” by Kelly Reetz

Direct Observations

Sample Student Observation Report: “Observations of an Inner-City Apartment Building” by Caleb Thomas

 


READER

Rhetorical Table of Contents

*indicates selections that use multiple strategies.


Narration

“The Perfect Picture” by James Alexander Thom

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

*“Sound and Fury” by Dan Greenburg


Description

“When the Full Moon Shines Its Magic over Monument Valley,” by John V. Young

“Seaside Safari” by Kessler Burnett

*“Back to the Future” by John Phillip Santos


Process Analysis

“Ground-Source-Heat-Pumps: Mother Earth Will Wrap You in Warmth” by Perfect Home HVAC Design.com

“Let’s Get Vertical!” by Beth Wald

*“What Is the Creative Process?” by Tanner Christensen


Illustration

“Accidental Discoveries,” by Lexi Krock

“If You’re Happy and You Know It, Must I Know It, Too?” by Judith Newman

*“The Revolution in the Living Room” by Catherine Steiner Adair

 

Classification

“A Tale of Four Learners,” by Bernice McCarthy

“Different Types of Distance Learning: The Four General Categories for Online Programs,” by Campus Explorer

*“What Kind of Procrastinator Are You? By Alina Vrabie

 

Comparison

“Grant and Lee: A Study in Contrasts” by Bruce Catton

“Invasion of the Bodybuilders” by Chris Lee

*“Are Video Games Now More Sophisticated than Cinema?” by Jane Graham

 

Cause and Effect

“For Cops, Citizen Videos Bring Increased Scrutiny” by Kevin Johnson

“Why We Keep Stuff” by Caroline Knapp

*“Beautiful Brains” by David Dobbs


Definition

“The Blended Economy” by Marc Zwelling

“Krumping” by Marti Bercaw

*“The Power of No” by Judith Sills

 

Argument

“Going Nuclear” by Patrick Moore

“Ten Reasons Why Nuclear Was a Mistake—Even Before Fukushima” by Alexis Rowell

“Teacher Natalie Munroe Has a Right to Call Kids Lazy and Rude” by Maressa Brown

*“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

“Why Keystone Pipeline is a Bad Idea for Texas” by Chris Wilson

“Keystone Pipeline Foes Should Face Reality” by Christopher R. Knittel

 

 

Thematic Table of Contents

Life’s Changes

“The Perfect Picture” by James Alexander Thom  

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“Back to the Future” by John Phillip Santos 

“The Revolution in the Living Room” by Catherine Steiner Adair

“Why We Keep Stuff” by Caroline Knapp 

“Beautiful Brains” by David Dobbs

 

Who We Are  

“The Appeal of the Androgynous Man” by Amy Gross  

“Sound and Fury” by Dan Greenburg  

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“Back to the Future” by John Phillip Santos  

“What is the Creative Process?” by Tanner Christensen  

“The Revolution in the Living Room” by Catherine Steiner Adair

“A Tale of Four Learners” by Bernice McCarthy  

“What Kind of Procrastinator are You?” by Alina Vrabie

“Invasion of the Bodybuilders” by Chris Lee  

“Why We Keep Stuff” by Caroline Knapp  

“Beautiful Brains” by David Dobbs

“The Power of No” by Judith Sills

 

Our Relationship to Nature

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“When the Full Moon Shines Its Magic over Monument Valley” by John V. Young 

“Back to the Future” by John Phillip Santos 

“Ground-Source-Heat-Pumps: Mother Earth Will Wrap You in Warmth” by Perfect Home HVAC Design 

“Let’s Get Vertical!” by Beth Wald  

“Going Nuclear” by Patrick Moore  

“Ten Reasons Why New Nuclear Was a Mistake—Even Before Fukushima” by Alexis Rowell  

“Why Keystone Pipeline is a Bad Idea for Texas” by Chris Wilson

“Keystone Pipeline Foes Should Face Reality” by Christopher Knittel

 

Education and Learning

“The Perfect Picture” by James Alexander Thom  

“Sound and Fury” by Dan Greenburg 

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“What is the Creative Process?” by Tanner Christensen  

“A Tale of Four Learners” by Bernice McCarthy  

“Different Types of Distance Learning: The Four General Categories for Online Programs” by Campus Explorer

“What Kind of Procrastinator are You?” by Alina Vrabie

“Beautiful Brains” by David Dobbs

“When Teachers Talk out of School” by Jonathan Zimmerman 

“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

 

Popular Culture and the Arts

“The Perfect Picture” by James Alexander Thom 

“What is the Creative Process?” by Tanner Christensen 

“If You’re Happy and You Know It, Must I Know, Too?” by Judith Newman 

“The Revolution in the Living Room” by Catherine Steiner Adair

“Different Types of Distance Learning: The Four General Categories for Online Programs” by Campus Explorer

“Invasion of the Bodybuilders” by Chris Lee

“Are Video Games Now More Sophisticated than Cinema?” by Jane Graham

“For Cops, Citizen Videos Bring Increased Scrutiny” by Kevin Johnson

“The Blended Economy” by Marc Zwelling 

“Krumping” by Marti Bercaw  

“When Teachers Talk out of School” by Jonathan Zimmerman 

“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

 

Science and Technology

“Mother Earth Will Wrap You in Warmth” by Perfect Home HVAC Design 

“Accidental Discoveries” by Lexi Krock

“The Revolution in the Living Room” by Catherine Steiner Adair

“Different Types of Distance Learning: The Four General Categories for Online Programs” by Campus Explorer

“Are Video Games Now More Sophisticated than Cinema?” by Jane Graham

“For Cops, Citizen Videos Bring Increased Scrutinyby Kevin Johnson 

“Going Nuclear” by Patrick Moore  (000)

“Ten Reasons Why New Nuclear Was a Mistake—Even Before Fukushima” by Alexis Rowell

“When Teachers Talk out of School” by Jonathan Zimmerman 

“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

“Why Keystone Pipeline is a Bad Idea for Texas” by Chris Wilson

“Keystone Pipeline Foes Should Face Reality” by Christopher Knittel

 

Diversity in Our Lives

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“Back to the Future” by John Phillip Santos  

“A Tale of Four Learners” by Bernice McCarthy  

“What Kind of Procrastinator are You?” by Alina Vrabie

“Invasion of the Bodybuilders” by Chris Lee  

“Krumping” by Marti Bercaw  

“Beautiful Brains” by David Dobbs

 

Language Use and Abuse

“Sound and Fury” by Dan Greenburg  

“Aunt Parnetta’s Electric Blisters” by Diane Glancy

“If You’re Happy and You Know It, Must I Know, Too?” by Judith Newman  

““The Blended Economy” by Marc Zwelling  

“The Power of NO” by Judith Sills

“When Teachers Talk out of School” by Jonathan Zimmerman  

“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

 

Struggling with Ethical Issues  

“The Perfect Picture” by James Alexander Thom  

“The Power of No” by Judith Sills

“For Cops, Citizen Videos Bring Increased Scrutiny” by Kevin Johnson 

“When Teachers Talk out of School” by Jonathan Zimmerman 

“Protecting Free Speech for Teachers in a Social Media World” by Todd Pettigrew

 


HANDBOOK

Sentence Elements

Subjects and Predicates  

Complements  

Appositives  

Parts of Speech  

Phrases and Clauses  

Editing to Correct Sentence Errors

Revising Sentence Fragments  

Revising Run-On Sentences and Comma Splices  

Creating Subject–Verb Agreement  

Achieving Pronoun–Antecedent Agreement  

Using Effective Pronoun Reference  

Managing Shifts in Person  

Using the Right Pronoun Case  

Creating Consistency in Showing Time  

Using Adjectives and Adverbs Effectively  

Placing Modifiers Correctly  

Revising Dangling Modifiers  

Maintaining Parallelism  

Revising Faulty Comparisons  

Editing to Correct Faulty Punctuation and Mechanics

Apostrophes  

Commas  

Semicolons  

Periods, Question Marks, and Exclamation Points  

Colons, Dashes, Parentheses, and Brackets  

Quotation Marks  

Hyphens  

Capitalization  

Abbreviations  

Numbers  

Italics