Structure and Chemistry of Crystalline Solids

Hardcover | June 9, 2006

byBodie Douglas, Shi-Ming Ho

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Crystallographers have an elegant system using definitive notation for describing crystal structures, but it does not serve as well the needs of many others working with crystalline solids. Most chemists, metallurgists, mineralogists, geologists and workers in material sciences need a simple system and notation for describing crystal structures. Structure and Chemistry of Crystalline Solids presents a widely applicable system with simple notation giving important information about the structure and the chemical environment of ions or molecules. It is easily understood and used by those concerned with applications dependent on structure-properties relationships. This book addresses the needs of people working with crystal structures in several fields, while most other books on crystal structures are more than two decades old. Early chapters provide an introduction to crystal structures and symmetry for readers with a variety of backgrounds. Insight into crystal structures, including some complex silicates, is aided by the use of the CrystalMaker computer program. Key Features:Understandable by anyone concerned with crystals or solid state properties dependent on structurePresents a general system using simple notation to reveal similarities and differences among crystal structuresDepicts more than 300 selected and prepared figures illustrating structures found in thousands of compounds

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From the Publisher

Crystallographers have an elegant system using definitive notation for describing crystal structures, but it does not serve as well the needs of many others working with crystalline solids. Most chemists, metallurgists, mineralogists, geologists and workers in material sciences need a simple system and notation for describing crystal s...

From the Jacket

Crystallographers have an elegant system using definitive notation for describing crystal structures, but it does not serve as well the needs of many others working with crystalline solids. Most chemists, metallurgists, mineralogists, geologists and materials scientists need a simple system and notation for describing crystal structure...

Bodie Douglas is Professor Emeritus of Chemistry of the University of Pittsburgh. He has had three editions of an inorganic chemistry textbook and a textbook on symmetry and group theory. He spent a year with the crystallographic group of Sir Gordon Cox at the University of Leeds (England). Shi-Ming Ho retired from Westinghouse Researc...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:356 pages, 10 × 7.01 × 0.27 inPublished:June 9, 2006Publisher:Springer New YorkLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387261478

ISBN - 13:9780387261478

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Table of Contents

-Introduction.  -Classification of Crystals, Point Groups and Space Groups. -Close Packing and the PTOT System. -Structures of The Elements. -Crystal Structures Involving P and 0 Layers. -Crystal Structures Involving P and T Layers. -Crystal Structures Involving P, T and O Layers. -Crystal Structures Involving Multiple Layers. -Crystal Structures of Some Intermetallic Compounds. -Crystal Structures of Silica and Metal Silicates. -Crystal Structures of Some Simple Organic Compounds.

Editorial Reviews

From the reviews of the first edition:"This book is very interesting and useful for its ability to describe systematically the often-overlooked similarities among crystal structures that appear, at first glance, to be very different. As such, it will appeal to specialists in crystal chemistry who are interested in probing deeper into structural similarities and differences in solid-state compounds and also to educators and students who desire supplementary information about crystal structures." (Raymond E. Schaak, JACS, Vol. 129 (2), 2007)