Subjects of Slavery, Agents of Change: Women and Power in Gothic Novels and Slave Narratives, 1790-1865 by Kari WinterSubjects of Slavery, Agents of Change: Women and Power in Gothic Novels and Slave Narratives, 1790-1865 by Kari Winter

Subjects of Slavery, Agents of Change: Women and Power in Gothic Novels and Slave Narratives, 1790…

byKari Winter

Paperback | July 1, 2010

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Analyzing the historical contexts in which female Gothic novels and slave narratives were composed, Kari J. Winter shows that both types of writing expose the sexual politics at the heart of patriarchal culture and represent terrifying aspects of life for women. Careful not to equate the status of slave and female, Winter reads both genres as sites of ideological struggle to examine how they engaged the dominant classist, racist, patriarchal discourse and created possibilities for new, feminist ways of thinking. Authors whose works are considered include Harriet Jacobs, Mary Prince, Nancy Prince, Louisa Picquet, Ann Radcliffe, Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, and Charlotte Brontë.
Kari J. Winter is a professor of American studies at the State University of New York at Buffalo. She is editor of The Blind African Slave: or, Memoirs of Boyrereau Brinch, Nick-named Jeffrey Brace.
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Title:Subjects of Slavery, Agents of Change: Women and Power in Gothic Novels and Slave Narratives, 1790…Format:PaperbackDimensions:186 pages, 9 × 6 × 10 inPublished:July 1, 2010Publisher:University Of Georgia PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0820336998

ISBN - 13:9780820336992

Editorial Reviews

Winter's consideration of the conjunctions between British female gothic novels and American slave narratives offers a more dynamic model for understanding the cross-fertilizations between the gothic and slavery . . . By exploring instead of collapsing the boundaries between different locations and traditions of the gothic and by seeing the gothic as a constantly moving form with no fixed abode, we begin to trace its web of monstrous relations. As we move into new critical paradigms such as Greater Atlantic studies, we might well turn to the gothic to map the new world's terrors as well as its complex encounters. - American Literary History