Suffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era by Laura E. FreeSuffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era by Laura E. Free

Suffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era

byLaura E. Free

Hardcover | November 6, 2015

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The Fourteenth Amendment, ratified on July 9, 1868, identified all legitimate voters as "male." In so doing, it added gender-specific language to the U.S. Constitution for the first time. Suffrage Reconstructed is the first book to consider how and why the amendment's authors made this decision. Vividly detailing congressional floor bickering and activist campaigning, Laura E. Free takes readers into the pre- and postwar fights over precisely who should have the right to vote. Free demonstrates that all men, black and white, were the ultimate victors of these fights, as gender became the single most important marker of voting rights during Reconstruction.Free argues that the Fourteenth Amendment's language was shaped by three key groups: African American activists who used ideas about manhood to claim black men's right to the ballot, postwar congressmen who sought to justify enfranchising southern black men, and women’s rights advocates who began to petition Congress for the ballot for the first time as the Amendment was being drafted. To prevent women’s inadvertent enfranchisement, and to incorporate formerly disfranchised black men into the voting polity, the Fourteenth Amendment’s congressional authors turned to gender to define the new American voter. Faced with this exclusion some woman suffragists, most notably Elizabeth Cady Stanton, turned to rhetorical racism in order to mount a campaign against sex as a determinant of one’s capacity to vote. Stanton’s actions caused a rift with Frederick Douglass and a schism in the fledgling woman suffrage movement. By integrating gender analysis and political history, Suffrage Reconstructed offers a new interpretation of the Civil War–era remaking of American democracy, placing African American activists and women’s rights advocates at the heart of nineteenth-century American conversations about public policy, civil rights, and the franchise.

Laura E. Free is Associate Professor of History at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Laura E. Free is Associate Professor of History at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.
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Title:Suffrage Reconstructed: Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War EraFormat:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 9.25 × 6.13 × 0.98 inPublished:November 6, 2015Publisher:Cornell University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0801450861

ISBN - 13:9780801450860

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Table of Contents

Introduction: We, the People1. The White Man's Government2. Manhood and Citizenship3. The Family Politic4. The Rights of Men5. That Word "Male"6. White Women’s RightsConclusion: By Reason of RaceAcknowledgments
Notes
Index

Editorial Reviews

"A decisive study of the evolution of American suffrage rights in the ante- and immediate post-bellum era(s), Laura Free's Suffrage Reconstructed makes significant contributions to the field of American intellectual history.... A wide audience of scholars, particularly African American and women's and gender historians would benefit from reading this text, as well as scholars interested in the political history of New York State." - NEW YORK HISTORY