Sync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time by James TobiasSync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time by James Tobias

Sync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time

byJames Tobias

Hardcover | July 30, 2010

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James Tobias is Associate Professor of Cinema and Digital Media Studies in the English Department of the University of California, Riverside.

James Tobias is Associate Professor of Cinema and Digital Media Studies in the English Department of the University of California, Riverside.
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Title:Sync: Stylistics of Hieroglyphic TimeFormat:HardcoverDimensions:304 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:July 30, 2010Publisher:Temple University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1439902011

ISBN - 13:9781439902011

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Reviews

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
1 Ciphers of Hieroglyphic Time
2 Eisenstein's Gesture: Breaking Down Alexander Nevsky
3 For Love of Music: Oskar Fischinger's Modal, Musical Diagram
4 Hanns Eisler's Dialectical Stream: Sync, Dissonance, and the Devil
5 Black Relationship: Improvising a Black Pacific
6  Melos, Telos, and Me: Transpositions of Identity in the Rock Musical
7 Stylistics of Hieroglyphic Time
Notes
Index

Editorial Reviews

"Sync offers a much needed and thoroughly radical revision of debates around synchronization, opening up a range of different audiovisual modalities to political analysis, and breaking the stranglehold that existing forms of political discourse have had on discussions of sound–image relations. The author's key move has been to employ the notion of synch (sic) to address not only the relationships between sound and image in audiovisual media but also those between text and audience, focusing primarily on the experience of reception....[T]he approach adopted by Tobias is highly original.... [T]here is much to recommend this book which, in providing new perspectives on the political dimensions of audiovisuality, repays the close attention it demands."—Screen