Tacitus: Dialogus de oratoribus by TacitusTacitus: Dialogus de oratoribus by Tacitus

Tacitus: Dialogus de oratoribus

byTacitusEditorRoland Mayer

Hardcover | May 28, 2001

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This is an edition of Tacitus' work on oratory, with a substantial introduction and commentary. It is the first commentary in English in over 100 years and the only one at this level. It is designed to elucidate problems of language and reference in the text and to put the reader in the picture as regards late first-century AD society and literature, particularly oratory, still the most important activity within the Roman élite.
Tacitus was a Roman senator who survived the terror launched among the Roman aristocracy by the emperor Domitian to rise to prominence and become first suffect consul and later proconsul of Asia. His historical works, which originally covered the first century of the empire from the accession of Tiberius to the assassination of Domitia...
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Title:Tacitus: Dialogus de oratoribusFormat:HardcoverDimensions:238 pages, 7.32 × 4.84 × 0.87 inPublished:May 28, 2001Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521470404

ISBN - 13:9780521470407

Reviews

Table of Contents

Introduction: 1. The background; 2. Tacitus' career; 3. The Agricola; 4. Fame; 5. The state of oratory; 6. The Dialogus; 7. Authenticity; 8. Date of composition; 9. The style of the work; 10. The lay-out of the Dialogus; 11. Characters and characterization; 12. The transmission of the text; CORNELI TACITI DIALOGVS DE ORATORIBVS; Commentary.

Editorial Reviews

"...Professor Mayer has presented us with a splendid edition, up-to-date in every way, in the series 'Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics.' He has done great service to all students of Latin literature, Roman rhetoric and oratory, and above all Tacitus." Religious Studies Review