Tales from 'Bentley'. by Bentley's MiscellanyTales from 'Bentley'. by Bentley's Miscellany

Tales from 'Bentley'.

byBentley's Miscellany

Paperback | January 12, 2012

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This historic book may have numerous typos, missing text or index. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. 1860. Not illustrated. Excerpt: ... "Gibson," said he hurriedly, and in some agitation, "you had better come again in an hour or two. But stay; I don't know what to say." He paused. "What is best to be done?" "What is the matter?" I inquired. "Mr. Steiner is returned;" and he pointed to a door which communicated with an adjoining chamber. "Well, sir, I am glad of it, for your sako. You have been anxious for his return." Bromley looked perplexed, but presently motioned me to take a seat. "You may as well see him at once, perhaps," he remarked. I bowed. "I shall be very glad to see him." At this moment Steiner, who, I think, had been listening, opened the door, and, flinging it after him, strode into the middle of the room. There was a kind of white calmness in his face, which I knew well how to interpret. "Well, this is a very pretty piece of business; indeed, is it'" said he. "What do you think, Mr. Gibson?" "It is a very sad one," I answered. "Have you no conception how it originated?" he inquired. "None whatever." "Do you mean to say," he resumed with quickness, "that you do not know how the fire was caused--by what--by whom?" "I do." Steiner took Bromley aside, and began to talk to him in a low tone. It was a relief to me, his doing so at that moment. A sudden faintness, a desertion of the vital powers, had in an instant reduced me to the helplessness of a child; I dreaded the interview which I foresaw was about to take place. He suspected me, that was certain; perhaps had obtained some clue--some witness against me. I felt that I could not confront him like au innocent man; I had not even strength to eudeavour to do so. "Had you not better be seated?" said Steiner, turning towards me, for I had remained standing motionless. Steiner sat for a while absorbed in thought, with his eyes fixed upon ...
Title:Tales from 'Bentley'.Format:PaperbackDimensions:66 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.14 inPublished:January 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217057993

ISBN - 13:9780217057998

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