Teaching History In The Digital Age by T. Mills KellyTeaching History In The Digital Age by T. Mills Kelly

Teaching History In The Digital Age

byT. Mills Kelly

Paperback | June 20, 2016

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Although many humanities scholars have been talking and writing about the transition to the digital age for more than a decade, only in the last few years have we seen a convergence of the factors that make this transition possible: the spread of sufficient infrastructure on campuses, the creation of truly massive databases of humanities content, and a generation of students that has never known a world without easy Internet access.
 
Teaching History in the Digital Age serves as a guide for practitioners on how to fruitfully employ the transformative changes of digital media in the research, writing, and teaching of history. T. Mills Kelly synthesizes more than two decades of research in digital history, offering practical advice on how to make best use of the results of this synthesis in the classroom and new ways of thinking about pedagogy in the digital humanities.

T. Mills Kelly is Professor and an Associate Director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University.
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Title:Teaching History In The Digital AgeFormat:PaperbackDimensions:182 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.6 inPublished:June 20, 2016Publisher:University of Michigan PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0472036769

ISBN - 13:9780472036769

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Editorial Reviews

“History educators have for the most part been slow to embrace the digital world inhabited by their students in their teaching. This book is part practical attempt to encourage and assist them to do so; part reflective meditation on what history ‘is’ and how historians think about fostering higher learning through history; and part impassioned appeal for historians to recast what they do in the classroom in the light of a changed student population.” —Alan Booth, University of Nottingham