Telegraphic Imperialism: Crisis and Panic in the Indian Empire, c.1830-1920 by Deep Kanta Lahiri Choudhury

Telegraphic Imperialism: Crisis and Panic in the Indian Empire, c.1830-1920

byDeep Kanta Lahiri Choudhury

Hardcover | October 27, 2010

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about

The first electronic communication network transformed language, distance, and time. This book researches the telegraph system of the British Indian Empire, c.1850 to 1920, exploring one of the most significant transnational phenomena of the imperial world, and the link between communication, Empire, and social change.

About The Author

DEEP KANTA LAHIRI CHOUDHURY trained in history at Presidency College, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India, and University of Cambridge, UK. He did his Post-Doctorate at University of Oxford. He has taught, lectured and supervised at various institutions including Cambridge, Oxford, Bristol, Jamia Millia Islamia and Visva Bharati, Shant...

Details & Specs

Title:Telegraphic Imperialism: Crisis and Panic in the Indian Empire, c.1830-1920Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.5 × 5.51 × 0.04 inPublished:October 27, 2010Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230205062

ISBN - 13:9780230205062

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Extra Content

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Introduction
From Laboratory to Museum: the Changing Culture of Science and Experiment in India, circa 1830-1856
The Telegraph and the Uprisings of 1857
The Discipline of Technology
Making the Twain Meet: the New Imperialism of Telegraphy
The Magical Mystery Tour: Cable Telegraphy
Telegraphic Imperialism: Expansion and Consolidation within India 146-174
The Telegraph General Strike of 1908
Swadeshi and Information Panic: Functions and Malfunctions of the Information Order, c.1900-1912
Conclusion
Bibliography