Ten Miles One Way by Patrick DownesTen Miles One Way by Patrick Downes

Ten Miles One Way

byPatrick Downes

Hardcover | March 21, 2017

Pricing and Purchase Info

$20.09 online 
$23.99 list price save 16%
Earn 100 plum® points

Prices and offers may vary in store

Quantity:

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Available in stores

about

The powerful story of a mind at the edge of unraveling, held together by love and acceptance.

Nest and Q walk through the city. Nest speaks and Q listens. Mile by mile, Nest tells Q about her life, her family, her past . . . and her Chimaera, the beast that preys on her mind and causes her to lose herself. Q knows only that his love for Nest runs deeper than the demon that plagues her thoughts, that he loves her in spite of—or perhaps because of—the personal battle she fights every day.

A beautifully-written, haunting story.

Praise for Ten Miles One Way:

“A loving but honest treatment of mental illness, these words will sing off the page and into your heart. No question: the world is a better place with Patrick Downes writing in it.”—A. M. Jenkins, author of the Printz Honor Book Repossessed

* "Downes subtly plumbs the depths of mental illness within the broader context of relationship and self-awareness....An intricate, unusual love story for readers attuned to compassion."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review

"Through bewitching prose, idiosyncratic detail, and the presentation of a mind simultaneously on the edge of epiphany and exhaustion, breakthrough and breakdown, Downes crafts a tender portrayal of both mental illness and love itself. Part romance, part poetry, and part monologue, perceptive teens will devour this one."—Booklist

"This is a dark, affecting tale about the mind of a bipolar adolescent attempting to run from her own thoughts, and her boyfriend, who listens, learns, and loves her throughout everything. Many readers will connect with this raw, powerful portrait of a young person living with mental illness. Recommended for most YA collections."—School Library Journal

"What’s most interesting is that underneath the journey and the mental illness and even the harrowing crash, this is at the core a love story, one that isn’t always pretty or even healthy but is absolutely memorable."—BCCB

"Downes doesn’t cloak the depth of Nest’s suffering nor offer false promises about love’s ability to rescue or redeem."—Publishers Weekly

Praise for Fell of Dark:

* “A stunning debut novel that offers sophisticated readers a glimpse into the psychological disintegration of two distinct characters.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
* “[W]hether in an image or in a confused, despairing reaction to an incomprehensible world . . . Downes’s vision will connect into an epiphany.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review
 
* “Readers willing to sink into the depths of two unstrung teens and their frantic individual struggles to understand the cruelties and redemptions of the universe will be rewarded by this disarming, thought-provoking, and entrancing story.”—Booklist, starred review
 
“Here is a book built of darkness and gleam, of raw emotion and shattering poetry, of harrowing compulsions and zero compromise. Patrick Downes possesses blazing, beautiful, terrifying talent. His characters walk the shadows. His language bursts like sky.”—Beth Kephart, National Book Award nominee
 
“Luminous and pure. A masterwork of astonishing authority and beauty.”—Julie Berry, author of All the Truth That’s in Me
Originally from New York City, Patrick Downes splits his time between the United States and Canada. His first book, Fell of Dark, received multiple starred reviews and was named to the New York Public Library’s 2015 Best Books for Teens list and to Publishers Weekly’s Best Summer Books of 2015 list. Patrick writes for all ages.
Loading
Title:Ten Miles One WayFormat:HardcoverDimensions:208 pages, 8.56 × 5.75 × 0.74 inPublished:March 21, 2017Publisher:Penguin Young Readers GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0399544992

ISBN - 13:9780399544996

Reviews

Read from the Book

The WhyIt’s been five days since Nest drove a car into a tree at sixty miles an hour. She’s sleeping. Unconscious, at any rate. If and when she wakes, she will face questions. What else? I was there in the car, next to her, a helpless passenger. What do I remember about the collision? Not much. My own memory of it can’t be trusted. I remember—. I remember the Chimaera behind the wheel. The Chimaera roaring in the middle of a great fire. The lion roaring fire. The goat bleating. The poised snake. No one can get near, it’s all so hot. I’ve been questioned by doctors and the police. I don’t mention the Chimaera. Otherwise, I’m honest. “Nest asked me if I wanted to go for a drive, and I said yes.” “I remember my life up until I shut the passenger door.” “I don’t know why Nest drove the car into a tree. I don’t think she intended to.” “Yes, I know she’s totaled two cars in two years. But—. You don’t know about her headaches. The first time, a headache shut her eyes. She should have pulled over sooner, but. The same thing happened to her father.” “I’ve known Nest almost half my life. Her boyfriend, yes, off and on. Off, lately.” “Suicide? I can’t answer that. I don’t think that’s in her. She gets—. Her mind. She’s bipolar, sometimes psychotic. Yes. No. She seemed happy and calm enough when we started, then BOOM.” “I’d say black ice. Maybe, snow. It’s December, right?” “No drugs, no alcohol. You must know that already.” “Boom. Just boom.” “I’m alive.” “My name is Isaac Kew.” * Nest calls me Q. I am, right now, an empty Q. Q without Nest. I fell in love with Nest in eighth grade, when we were thirteen, at exactly the same moment when I hated her. She cast me as a fire hydrant in a class play she’d written. She has, since we met, teased me for being stupid, but that’s only because she told me first thing she had a silent P in front of her name, and I believed her. I was gullible. But I was gullible because I had no reason to doubt the first girl I’d decided was beautiful. “P-N-E-S-T,” I said, spelling it out. “But silent. Like the P in pneumatic. Or pneumonia.” “That’s right,” Nest said. “Just like that.” “Cool,” I said. Then she said: “I think you’d make a great fire hydrant.” Every so often, Nest relents. When we were driving, for example, five days ago, the night of the collision. I remember this. “I’ve never thought for a moment you’re actually dumb,” she said. “But you’ve always had a giant love for me. It’s not stupid to love unquestioningly. It’s beautiful. What’s stupid is that my brain makes other people’s love seem ridiculous. I am the Chimaera. Beast and girl, and deadly. I am unlovable.” That last sentence: “I am unlovable.” That would have been enough for the police to think Nest really had wanted to die outright, commit suicide, and was willing to take me with her. I’m not convinced. I believe, no matter how Nest’s illness rips her up, Nest knows I love her. Nest knows her mother and father love her. It’s difficult to end your life when you know you’re loved. Not impossible. But difficult. Nest was right, though. I don’t have her intelligence—or trouble. I’ll never be forced to take a drug to calm down. I’ll never see the inside of a mental ward, except to visit. And I’ll never have a mythical beast living inside of me. * I’ve been writing almost five days straight to no one in particular. To the you we all have inside of us, not ourselves but no one else either. Not quite a god or a devil; not quite a friend, not quite a hero. No one in particular, but someone just the same. There are two styles of handwriting here. Myself in one. Most of it, though, in a handwriting to show when Nest’s speaking aloud to me. Speaking and speaking for miles. Three years ago, when we were seventeen, Nest asked me to go on a walk with her. I’m writing out half of it, ten miles. This is in case she dies. I don’t want the world to think she died without ever having been loved. * Nest had never asked me on one of her walks before. Manic walks, when she thought and felt in a rush and talked to herself and somehow made it home alive. She always went alone, once a week, sometimes more, for months, depending on how she slept. She’s someone for whom sleep was a disaster. It was her father who started taking her on walks, day or night, when she was young. I knew that, but not—. I don’t want to say too much too soon. I want you to hear what happened over the course of a long walk, or half a long walk. The second half doesn’t matter. I don’t know if the second half even exists. I don’t remember ever making it home.

Editorial Reviews

Praise for Ten Miles One Way:“A loving but honest treatment of mental illness, these words will sing off the page and into your heart. No question: the world is a better place with Patrick Downes writing in it.”—A. M. Jenkins, author of the Printz Honor Book Repossessed* "Downes subtly plumbs the depths of mental illness within the broader context of relationship and self-awareness....An intricate, unusual love story for readers attuned to compassion."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review"Through bewitching prose, idiosyncratic detail, and the presentation of a mind simultaneously on the edge of epiphany and exhaustion, breakthrough and breakdown, Downes crafts a tender portrayal of both mental illness and love itself. Part romance, part poetry, and part monologue, perceptive teens will devour this one."—Booklist"This is a dark, affecting tale about the mind of a bipolar adolescent attempting to run from her own thoughts, and her boyfriend, who listens, learns, and loves her throughout everything. Many readers will connect with this raw, powerful portrait of a young person living with mental illness. Recommended for most YA collections."—School Library Journal"What’s most interesting is that underneath the journey and the mental illness and even the harrowing crash, this is at the core a love story, one that isn’t always pretty or even healthy but is absolutely memorable."—BCCB"Downes doesn’t cloak the depth of Nest’s suffering nor offer false promises about love’s ability to rescue or redeem."—Publishers WeeklyPraise for Fell of Dark:* “A stunning debut novel that offers sophisticated readers a glimpse into the psychological disintegration of two distinct characters.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review * “[W]hether in an image or in a confused, despairing reaction to an incomprehensible world . . . Downes’s vision will connect into an epiphany.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review * “Readers willing to sink into the depths of two unstrung teens and their frantic individual struggles to understand the cruelties and redemptions of the universe will be rewarded by this disarming, thought-provoking, and entrancing story.”—Booklist, starred review “Here is a book built of darkness and gleam, of raw emotion and shattering poetry, of harrowing compulsions and zero compromise. Patrick Downes possesses blazing, beautiful, terrifying talent. His characters walk the shadows. His language bursts like sky.”—Beth Kephart, National Book Award nominee “Luminous and pure. A masterwork of astonishing authority and beauty.”—Julie Berry, author of All the Truth That’s in Me