Tenants in Time: Family Strategies, Land, and Liberalism in Upper Canada, 1799-1871 by Catharine Anne WilsonTenants in Time: Family Strategies, Land, and Liberalism in Upper Canada, 1799-1871 by Catharine Anne Wilson

Tenants in Time: Family Strategies, Land, and Liberalism in Upper Canada, 1799-1871

byCatharine Anne Wilson

Paperback | July 1, 2009

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Using evidence from across Upper Canada she shows how tenancy transformed the landscape and tied old and new settlers together in a continuum of mutual dependence that was essential to settlement, capital creation, and social mobility. Her analysis of customary rights reveals a landlord-tenant relationship - and a concept of ownership - more complex and flexible than previously understood. Landlords, from ordinary farmers to absentee aristocrats, are also part of the story and the much-criticized clergy reserves take a positive role. An intimate exploration of Cramahe Township follows tenants over the generations as they supported their families and combined liberal ideas with household-centered ways.

From aggregate statistics to individual human dramas, Tenants in Time unravels the life of the tenant farmer in a wonderfully documented, engaging, and compelling argument.
Catharine Anne Wilson is professor of history, University of Guelph, and the author of the award-winning works A New Lease on Life and Reciprocal Work Bees and the Meaning of Neighbourhood.
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Title:Tenants in Time: Family Strategies, Land, and Liberalism in Upper Canada, 1799-1871Format:PaperbackDimensions:384 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:July 1, 2009Publisher:McGill-Queen's University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0773535233

ISBN - 13:9780773535237

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Editorial Reviews

"An important contribution to Canadian historiography, drawing attention to an under-examined, indeed almost unknown aspect of Canadian settlement history." Ruth Sandwell, University of Toronto