Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, authorship, and sexualities in Renaissance drama by Jeffrey MastenTextual Intercourse: Collaboration, authorship, and sexualities in Renaissance drama by Jeffrey Masten

Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, authorship, and sexualities in Renaissance drama

byJeffrey Masten

Paperback | February 28, 1997

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Textual Intercourse brings together literary criticism, theater history, the study of printed books, and gender studies, to show how the writing of Renaissance drama was conceptualized in the languages of sex, gender, and eroticism. Jeffrey Masten argues that the plays of Shakespeare and others, and the way in which those plays were first printed, illustrates a shift from a model of collaboration to one of singular authorship. Using methods attuned to sexuality and gender, Masten illuminates questions of authorship and intellectual property.
Title:Textual Intercourse: Collaboration, authorship, and sexualities in Renaissance dramaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:February 28, 1997Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521589207

ISBN - 13:9780521589208

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Seeing double: collaboration and the interpretation of Renaissance drama; 2. Between gentlemen: homoeroticism, collaboration, and the discourse of friendship; 3. Representing authority: patriarchalism, absolutism, and the author on stage; 4. Reproducing works: dramatic quartos and folios in the seventeenth century; 5. Mistris Corrivall: Margaret Cavendish's dramatic production; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Masten's provocative thesis has significant implications for our understanding of authorship, sexuality, and ideological transformation in seventeenth-century England, and should be taken as a necessary point of depaarture for future scholarship in these areas." Mario DiGangi, Journal of English & Germanic Philology