The Administration of Sickness: Medicine and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Algeria

Hardcover | November 15, 2008

byWilliam Gallois

not yet rated|write a review
This book is the first comprehensive study of the history of French medicine in nineteenth-century Algeria. It argues that the medicalization of Algerian was a priority for colonial regimes across the century, but that this goal was thwarted by gaps which lay between the imagined capacity of French medicine and its actual efficacy, by institutional rivalries, and by the manner in which medicine became a focus for the resistance of French domination and rule.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$149.50

In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

This book is the first comprehensive study of the history of French medicine in nineteenth-century Algeria. It argues that the medicalization of Algerian was a priority for colonial regimes across the century, but that this goal was thwarted by gaps which lay between the imagined capacity of French medicine and its actual efficacy, by ...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 8.79 × 5.58 × 0.9 inPublished:November 15, 2008Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230500439

ISBN - 13:9780230500433

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Administration of Sickness: Medicine and Ethics in Nineteenth-Century Algeria

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Preface * Algeria and the Idea of Medicine * Arrival: A New Environment * The Idea of Medical Imperialism 1830-70 * Medicine and the Idea of Algeria 1830-70: The Practice of Medicine and Health * Famine, Demography, Genocide * Race, Colons, and Competition in Algeria 1870-1900 * Eight Doctors * Medicine in Algeria 1900-62 * Conclusion

Editorial Reviews

“A welcome intervention in an emerging field [...] This is an engaged and sometimes provocative exploration of the moral and ideological structures of colonial medicine in Algeria. It invites us to examine medical practices and lived experiences so that we might see the tensions and fractures which lay at the heart of the idea of colonial medicine and a medicalized colonial society.” -- Revue d’Histoire du XIXe Siecle