The American Consul: A History of the United States Consular Service, 1776-1914

Hardcover | February 1, 1990

byCharles Stuart Kennedy

not yet rated|write a review
This book is a history of the United States Consular Service, an unheralded, but significant element in the promotion of American commerce and influence abroad from the Revolution onward. A group of relatively minor officials, appointed by the vagaries of political patronage and virtually ignored by successive Secretaries of State, American consuls were established in most major foreign ports and trading centers early in the history of the Republic. Consular officers were major players in America's overseas presence because of their special responsibility for seamen and shipping. They were the officials most concerned with the Barbary pirates and worked with the United States Navy to remove them from the Mediterranean. Until 1822 they were the only official representative of the U.S. government in the emerging republics of Latin America. American consuls in Britain helped prevent the Confederates from assembling and supplying a fleet out of European ports. The Spanish-American War was essentially a "consular war"-fought in colonial territories where consuls supplied intelligence and support for American miliary actions. The American Consul is a long overdue history of the Consular Service. It introduces, through brief histories, anecdotes, and vignettes, some of the men sent abroad by an imperfect system to represent our country. It is an evolving chronicle of their contributions to the expansion of American influence from the start of the Revolutionary War to the eve of the First World War, when American diplomats assumed the predominant role in America's foreign relations. This book is must reading for anyone interested in American diplomatic history.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$161.45 online
$183.50 list price (save 12%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

This book is a history of the United States Consular Service, an unheralded, but significant element in the promotion of American commerce and influence abroad from the Revolution onward. A group of relatively minor officials, appointed by the vagaries of political patronage and virtually ignored by successive Secretaries of State, Ame...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:247 pages, 9.62 × 6.44 × 0.99 inPublished:February 1, 1990Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313272123

ISBN - 13:9780313272127

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The American Consul: A History of the United States Consular Service, 1776-1914

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

?The American Consul is a wonderful compilation of short biographies and anecdotes describing particular consuls and their adventures in often exotic locales. Its overarching theme is the relative competence and success of most consuls even while the consular service itself stood in desperate need of reform. . . . This is a fascinating and useful book.?-The Journal of American History