The Amphibians and Reptiles of New York State: Identification, Natural History, and Conservation by James P. Gibbs

The Amphibians and Reptiles of New York State: Identification, Natural History, and Conservation

byJames P. Gibbs, Alvin R. Breisch, Peter K. Ducey

Paperback | April 19, 2007

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This is the first guide yet produced to the amphibians and reptiles of New York State, a large and heavily populated state that hosts a surprisingly diverse and interesting community of amphibians and reptiles. This much needed guide to the identification, distribution, natural history andconservation of the amphibians and reptiles of New York State fill a long-empty niche. The book is the first comprehensive presentation of the distributional data gathered for the New York State Amphibian and Reptile Atlas project. With more than 60,000 records compiled from 1990-1999, this extraordinary and up-to-date database provides a rich foundation for the book. This volumeprovides detailed narratives on the 69 species native to New York State. With a heavy emphasis on conservation biology, the book also includes chapters on threats, legal protections, habitat conservation guidelines, and conservation case studies. Also included are 67 distribution maps and 62 pages of color photographs contributed by more than 30 photographers. As a field guide or a desk reference, The Amphibians and Reptiles of New York State is indispensable for anyone interested in the vertebrate animals of the Northeast, as well asstudents, field researchers and natural resource professionals.

About The Author

James Gibbs is Associate Professor in Environmental and Forest Biology at SUNY-ESF Syracuse. Alvin Breisch is State Herpetologist for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Peter Ducey is a Professor of Biology at SUNY Cortland. Glenn Johnson is a Professor of Biology at SUNY Potsdam. The Late John Behler was with...
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Details & Specs

Title:The Amphibians and Reptiles of New York State: Identification, Natural History, and ConservationFormat:PaperbackDimensions:504 pages, 5.31 × 8.19 × 1.1 inPublished:April 19, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195304446

ISBN - 13:9780195304442

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments1. Introduction2. Amphibians and Reptiles of New York State3. New York State's Environment as Habitat for Amphibians and Reptiles4. Salamanders5. Frogs and Toads6. Turtles7. Lizards and Snakes8. Threats9. Legal Protections10. Habitat Conservation Guidelines11. Conservation Case Studies12. Finding and Studying Amphibians and Reptiles13. Folklore14. Epilogue"Herp Atlas" report cardResourcesGlossaryLiterature CitedIndex

Editorial Reviews

"The authors of this solid book combine a huge amount of experience and together probably have more expertise than those of any other state guide. I particularly enjoyed the sections on the history of herpetology studies in New York State and the nods to the urban herpetofauna of New YorkCity. The book is explicitly oriented toward people who want to identify specimens they've encountered and learn more about the animals in their area." --Russell Burke, Hofstra University