The Angel Of History by Carolyn ForcheThe Angel Of History by Carolyn Forche

The Angel Of History

byCarolyn Forche

Paperback | February 3, 1995

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Placed in the context of twentieth-century moral disaster--war, genocide, the Holocaust, the atomic bomb--Forche's ambitions and compelling third collection of poems is a meditation of memory, specifically how memory survives the unimaginable. The poems reflect the effects of such experience: the lines, and often the images within them, are fragmented discordant. But read together, these lines, become a haunting mosaic of grief, evoking the necessary accommodations human beings make to survive what is unsurvivable. As poets have always done, Forche attempts to gibe voice to the unutterable, using language to keep memory alive, relive history, and link the past with the future.

Carolyn Forché is the author of Gathering the Tribes, winner of the Yale Younger Poets Award; The Country Between Us, which received awards from the Academy of American Poets and the Poetry Society of America; and The Angel of History, awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Award. She is also the editor of the anthology Against Forgetting:...
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Title:The Angel Of HistoryFormat:PaperbackDimensions:96 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.21 inPublished:February 3, 1995Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0060925841

ISBN - 13:9780060925840

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From Our Editors

New from award-winning poet Carolyn Forche is The Angel of History. Placed in the context of 20th century moral disasters, these poems are a meditation on memory and a haunting mosaic of grief, evoking the necessary accommodations human beings make to survive what is unsurvivable.

Editorial Reviews

"A dark, richly textured, complicated work...[The Angel of History] is that great rarity, an altogether new thing." (Liz Rosenberg, Boston Globe)