The Art of Being Black: The Creation of Black British Youth Identities

Hardcover | May 1, 1996

byClaire E. Alexander

not yet rated|write a review
The Art of Being Black explores how young black Britons create their cultural identities. Claire Alexander rejects the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict, or as the focus of a problem; she offers a fresh exploration of the strengths and ambiguities of black youthrepresentations as they are imagined and lived through, focusing in particular on community, `class', social life, and masculinity. Young black men have been typecast as hostile and culturally confused, alienated from their parents and from society; as `folk devils' (the stock images of the black mugger, the Rastafarian drug dealer, the rioter, the Yardie), creating problems for society in general. To get a truer view, DrAlexander spent twelve months as `one of the boys' in a group of young black Londoners; the resulting highly personal, in-depth, and very readable study counters the usual image of ethnic identity as fixed and immutable. Drawing on contemporary debates about culture and ethnicity, this book offers the close observation and informed analysis needed to bring to life theories of black cultural identity.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$137.66
$186.00 list price save 25%
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From Our Editors

The Art of Being Black explores how young black Britons create their cultural identities. Claire Alexander rejects the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict, or as the focus of a problem; she offers a fresh exploration of the strengths and ambiguities of black youth representations as they are imagined and live...

From the Publisher

The Art of Being Black explores how young black Britons create their cultural identities. Claire Alexander rejects the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict, or as the focus of a problem; she offers a fresh exploration of the strengths and ambiguities of black youthrepresentations as they are imagined and lived...

From the Jacket

The Art of Being Black explores how young black Britons create their cultural identities. Claire Alexander rejects the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict, or as a focus of a problem; she offers a fresh exploration of the strengths and ambiguities of black youth representations as they are imagined and lived ...

Claire E. Alexander is a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Open University. She was previously Junior Dean at Somerville College, Oxford.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:222 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.71 inPublished:May 1, 1996Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198279825

ISBN - 13:9780198279822

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Art of Being Black: The Creation of Black British Youth Identities

Reviews

Extra Content

From Our Editors

The Art of Being Black explores how young black Britons create their cultural identities. Claire Alexander rejects the common tendency to view black communities in terms of conflict, or as the focus of a problem; she offers a fresh exploration of the strengths and ambiguities of black youth representations as they are imagined and lived through, focusing in particular on community, 'class', social life and masculinity. Young black men have been typecast as hostile and culturally confused, alienated from their parents and from society; as 'folk devils' (the stock images of the black mugger, the Rastafarian drug dealer, the rioter, the Yardie), creating problems for society in general. To get a truer view, Dr. Alexander spent twelve months as 'one of the boys' in a group of young black Londoners; the resulting highly personal, in-depth, and very readable study counters the usual image of ethnic identity as fixed and immutable. Drawing on contemporary debates about culture and ethnicity, this book offers the close observation and informed analysis needed to bring to

Editorial Reviews

`This is pure academia, a text for sociology students.'Darcus Howe, Sunday Telegraph