The Banana Men: American Mercenaries And Entrepreneurs In Central American, 1880-1930 by Lester D. LangleyThe Banana Men: American Mercenaries And Entrepreneurs In Central American, 1880-1930 by Lester D. Langley

The Banana Men: American Mercenaries And Entrepreneurs In Central American, 1880-1930

byLester D. Langley

Paperback | February 1, 1996

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Ambitious entrepreneurs, isthmian politicians, and mercenaries who dramatically altered Central America's political culture, economies, and even its traditional social values populate this lively story of a generation of North and Central Americans and their roles in the transformation of Central America from the late nineteenth century until the onset of the Depression. The Banana Men is a study of modernization, its benefits, and its often frightful costs. The political and social turmoil of modern Central America cannot be understood without reference to the fifty-year epoch in which the United States imposed its political and economic influence on vulnerable Central American societies. The predicament of Central Americans today, as isthmian peoples know, is rooted in their past, and North Americans have had a great deal to do with the shaping of their history, for better or worse.
Title:The Banana Men: American Mercenaries And Entrepreneurs In Central American, 1880-1930Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 8.52 × 5.57 × 0.64 inPublished:February 1, 1996Publisher:UNIVERSITY PRESS OF KENTUCKY

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0813108365

ISBN - 13:9780813108360

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Ambitious entrepreneurs, isthmian politicians, and mercenaries who dramatically altered Central America's political culture, economies, and even its traditional social values populate this lively story of a generation of North and Central Americans and their roles in the transformation of Central America from the late nineteenth century until the onset of the Depression. The Banana Men is a study of modernization, its benefits, and its often frightful costs. The political and social turmoil of modern Central America cannot be understood without reference to the fifty-year epoch in which the United States imposed its political and economic influence on vulnerable Central American societies. The predicament of Central Americans today, as isthmian peoples know, is rooted in their past, and North Americans have had a great deal to do with the shaping of their history, for better or worse.