The Best American Science Writing 2011 by Rebecca Skloot

The Best American Science Writing 2011

byRebecca Skloot

Paperback | September 27, 2011

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The 2011 edition of the popular annual series that Kirkus Reviews hailed as “superb brain candy,” Best American Science Writing 2011 continues the tradition of gathering the most crucial, thought-provoking and engaging science writing of the year together into one extraordinary volume. Edited by Rebecca Skloot, award-winning science writer, contributing editor for Popular Science magazine, and author of the New York Times bestseller, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, along with her father, Floyd Skloot, multiple award-winning non-fiction writer and poet, and past contributor to the series, Best American Science Writing 2011 sheds brilliant light on the most amazing and confounding scientific issues and achievements of our time.

About The Author

Rebecca Skloot is an award-winning science writer whose work has appeared in theNew York Times Magazineand elsewhere. Her debut book,The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, became an instantNew York Timesbestseller. It was chosen as a best book of 2010 by more than sixty major media outlets, and is being adapted into an HBO film by Oprah...

Details & Specs

Title:The Best American Science Writing 2011Format:PaperbackDimensions:352 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.79 inPublished:September 27, 2011Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0062091247

ISBN - 13:9780062091246

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Editorial Reviews

“The list of impressive guest editors over the years—including Oliver Sacks, James Gleick, Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman—is joined this year by a father and daughter... Rebecca Skloot (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks) teams with her father Floyd, a past contributor to the series…Literate, nontechnical popular science.”