The Bible and the Narrative Tradition by Frank McConnellThe Bible and the Narrative Tradition by Frank McConnell

The Bible and the Narrative Tradition

EditorFrank McConnell

Paperback | May 1, 1994

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Until recently, studies of the Bible centered on finding sources for historical knowledge, theological insights, or ethical advice, overlooking the true beauty of the words in the "book of books." This collection of six essays by noted literary critics and biblical scholars--including HaroldBloom, Hans Frei, Frank Kermode, James Robinson, Donald Foster, and Herbert Schneidau--breaks new ground by exploring the Bible as poetry, rhetoric, and narrative. The authors treat such issues involved in biblical narrative as its genesis, its revisionist dynamic, its fictional character, itsinterpretive nature, and its contradictions, prejudices, and claims. McConnell's lively, readable introduction elucidates and unifies the book's themes.
Frank McConnell is at University of California, Santa Barbara.
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Title:The Bible and the Narrative TraditionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 8.27 × 5.51 × 0.47 inPublished:May 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019507002X

ISBN - 13:9780195070026

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"Perhaps the most important accomplishment of this provocative collection is its convincing demonstration that narrative is not another literary genre to be set alongside poetry and drama, epistle and apothegm. Story-telling seems virtually coeval with language itself, indeed withconsciousness itself."--Books and Religion