The Boastful Chef: The Discourse of Food in Ancient Greek Comedy

Hardcover | December 1, 2000

byJohn Wilkins

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It is well known that ancient Greek comedy is interested in food and wine. Many plays conclude with a feast: further, they were produced at festivals of Dionysos where eating and drinking took place. This book explains the importance of food to comedy: it was a medium through which comedycould represent the material, social, agricultural, political and religious worlds to the Greek city-state. Comedy was a powerful cultural commentator partly because the foods that it represented were resonant markers of the culture. There could be no comedy without food. Related genres andartefacts are also considered. The text also contains translations of hundreds of comic fragments; and it reassesses the division of comedy into Sicilian and Attic Old, Middle, and New.

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It is well known that ancient Greek comedy is interested in food and wine. Many plays conclude with a feast: further, they were produced at festivals of Dionysos where eating and drinking took place. This book explains the importance of food to comedy: it was a medium through which comedycould represent the material, social, agricultur...

John Wilkins is at University of Exeter.

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Format:HardcoverPublished:December 1, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:019924068X

ISBN - 13:9780199240685

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`The Boastful Chef is an erudite journey through many aspects of ancient comic literature.'Bryn Mawr Classical Review