The Body Broken: The Calvinist Doctrine of the Eucharist and the Symbolization of Power in Sixteenth-Century France by Christopher ElwoodThe Body Broken: The Calvinist Doctrine of the Eucharist and the Symbolization of Power in Sixteenth-Century France by Christopher Elwood

The Body Broken: The Calvinist Doctrine of the Eucharist and the Symbolization of Power in…

byChristopher Elwood

Hardcover | December 1, 1998

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In the public religious controversies of sixteenth-century France, no subject received more attention or provoked greater passion that the eucharist. In this study of Reformation theologies of the eucharist, Christopher Elwood contends that the doctrine for which French Protestants arguedplayed a pivotal role in the development of Calvinist revolutionary politics. By focusing on the new understandings of signs and symbols purveyed in Protestant writing on the sacrament of the Lords Supper, Elwood shows how adherents to the Reformation movement came to interpret the nature of powerand the relation between society and the sacred in ways that departed radically from the views of their Catholic neighbors. The clash of religious, social, and political ideals focused in interpretations of the sacrament led eventually to political violence that tore France apart in the latter halfof the sixteenth century.
Christopher Elwood is at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary.
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Title:The Body Broken: The Calvinist Doctrine of the Eucharist and the Symbolization of Power in…Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9.29 × 6.42 × 1.1 inPublished:December 1, 1998Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195121333

ISBN - 13:9780195121339

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Editorial Reviews

"Elwood's precise and lucid writing makes a plain way through theological exposition and 'semiotic realignments' that might in other hands have been altogether harder going... Elwood's illuminating work is a reminder...that the French religious crisis was indeed about religion; but also thatreligion, crucially and indissociably, was about power." Forum for Modern Language Studies