The Brave Athlete: Calm The F*ck Down And Rise To The Occasion by Simon Marshall, PhdThe Brave Athlete: Calm The F*ck Down And Rise To The Occasion by Simon Marshall, Phd

The Brave Athlete: Calm The F*ck Down And Rise To The Occasion

bySimon Marshall, Phd, Lesley Paterson

Paperback | June 8, 2017

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The Brave Athletesolves the 13 most common mental conundrums athletes face in their everyday training and in races.

You don't have one brain-you have three; your ancient Chimp brain that keeps you alive, your modern Professor brain that navigates the civilized world, and your Computer brain that accesses your memories and runs your habits (good and bad). They fight for controlall the timeand that's when bad things happen; you get crazy nervous before a race, you choke under pressure, you quit when the going gets tough, you make dumb mistakes, you worry about how you look.

What if you could stop the thoughts and feelings youdon'twant?What if you could feel confident, suffer like a hero, and handle any stress? You can.

The Brave Athletefrom Dr. Simon Marshall and Lesley Paterson will help you take control of your brain so you can train harder, race faster, and better enjoy your sport. Dr. Marshall is a sport psychology expert who trains the brains of elite professional athletes. Paterson is a three-time world champion triathlete and coach. Together, they offer this innovative, brain training guide that is the first to draw from both clinical science and real-world experience with athletes.

That means you won't find outdated "positive self-talk" or visualization gimmicks here. No, the set of cutting-edge mental skills revealed inThe Brave Athleteactuallyworkbecause they challenge the source of the thoughts and feelings you don't want.The Brave Athleteis packed with practical, evidence-based solutions to the most common mental challenges athletes face. Which of these sound like you?

-Why do I have thoughts and feelings I don't want?

-I wish I felt more like an athlete.

-I don't think I can.

-I don't achieve my goals.

-Other athletes seem tougher, happier, and more badass than me.

-I feel fat.

-I don't cope well with injury.

-People are worried about how much I exercise.

-I don't like leaving my comfort zone.

-When the going gets tough, the tough leave me behind.

-I need to harden the f*ck up.

-I keep screwing up.

-I don't handle pressure well.

WithThe Brave Athlete: Calm the F*ck Down and Rise to the Occasion, you can solve these problems to become mentally strong and make your brain your most powerful asset.

Dr. Simon Marshall trains the brains of endurance athletes and fitness enthusiasts to become happier and more mentally tough.He is former Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego and Professor of Exercise Science at San Diego State University where he was Director of the Graduate Program in...
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Title:The Brave Athlete: Calm The F*ck Down And Rise To The OccasionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:360 pages, 8.25 × 6.12 × 0.81 inPublished:June 8, 2017Publisher:VeloPressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1937715736

ISBN - 13:9781937715731

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Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Smart and stimulating Factual story telling that keeps you awake until 5am because you can't put the book down. Don't let the title fool you, this book is not just a read for people who are athletic or who enjoy sports. It is an interesting and insightful read for all that I highly recommend.
Date published: 2017-02-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Insightful This is a great book for any sports fan, but really hit me hard was the section on early specialization in youth sports. I know so many parents, myself included, who have pushed their kids into sports early in life and the knowledge shared here really altered my ideas about it. Worth the read.
Date published: 2017-01-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating Look into Sports and Genes! Fascinating look into the nature versus nurture argument in the production of elite athletes. Yes, passion for a sport, conducive local environment plus the 10,000 hours of practice rule help in athletic excellence but genetics and body-types are key to becoming an elite athlete. Enjoyable quick read. This book could easily have been expanded to include more insights into soccer and F1 racers fitness and genetic uniqueness.
Date published: 2015-08-13
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A look at nature and nurture applied to sports Contrary to the title, there isn't one gene that makes you great at all sports, but there are genes that can make you better at specific sports. So really, this is a book that goes over the genetics of successful people in every sport, from sprinting to dog sledding. With that said, it isn't a book that says only genes matter, it also looks in how the way Kenyans grow up and the opportunity of distance running plays into their success at that sport. Overall it seems to be a balanced picture at what makes successful athletes. I enjoyed it quite a bit.
Date published: 2015-03-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating! An excellent response to the 10,000 hr rule from the outliers. An interesting read for anyone interested in what it takes to be at the top of their sport. Great research , well written.
Date published: 2014-11-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating, even for casual athletes If you're even a casual athlete or weekend warrior, you'll be fascinated by this study of how different athletes of varying backgrounds and echelons of performance respond to different types of training. There's a lot more to Kenyan running success than altitude, for example, but altitude training does help, and it helps some Kenyan runners far more than others. The book surfaces big questions like, what's professional sport supposed to do with people whose natural physiology trips blood-doping tests? Human beings are really, really complex organisms, and sport pushes our limits in really interesting ways. I still think about this book when I'm out for a run.
Date published: 2014-11-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene Insightful. I'll never look at training the same way again.
Date published: 2014-08-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Sports Gene. Will Written and well Researched. Learned a lot of insight into not only Athletes but groups of people. Highly Recommend this Book!
Date published: 2014-08-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Read! I am only a short way into this book and I am already loving it. It's organized so you can read small portions at a time. I've read a lot about improving physical fitness and this book is great for improving your mental fitness.
Date published: 2014-07-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for coaches Incredibly well researched book, and thoroughly enjoyable to read. It had me rethinking much of what I had previously thought concerning what it takes to be a good athlete
Date published: 2014-07-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really fascinating read I really enjoyed this book. Doing it all fascinating... Love the genetics aspect, but also the research that it backs it up.
Date published: 2014-02-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Analyst This book opened my mind to the complicated interplay genetics have in sports. It challenges stereotyping and generalizing, and ultimately the bias we bring into our understanding of people and their abilities. The book is nuanced, which is a fair way to assess the topic.
Date published: 2014-01-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Sports Gene Great book. Highly interesting and thought provoking. A must read for anyone interested in the Science of Sport
Date published: 2013-09-01
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Brief Summary and Review *A full executive summary of this book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20, 2013. What does it take to become an elite athlete? The intuitive answer for most of us is that it probably takes some lucky genes on the one hand, and a whole heck of a lot of hard work on the other. Specifically, that we may need to be blessed with a particular body type to excel at a particular sport or discipline (after all, elite marathon runners tend to look far different from elite NFL running backs, who in turn tend to look far different from elite swimmers), but that beyond this it is practice and diligence that paves the way to success. When we look at the science, though--as sports writer David Epstein does in his new book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance--we find that the story is much more complicated than this. In general terms we find that nature and nurture interact at every step of the way in the development of an elite athlete, and that biology plays far more of a role (and in far more ways) than we may have expected. To begin with, when it comes to physiology, we find that biology does indeed have a large role to play in influencing our height and skeletal structure (as we would expect), but that biology also influences physiology in many other ways that are important when it comes to elite sports. For example, we find that people naturally vary widely in all of the following ways: the size of our heart and lungs, and the amount of red blood cells and hemoglobin that pumps through our veins; the specific type of muscle fibers that are most prevalent in our bodies (and the specific number of each); as well as our visual acuity--and again, all of these factors play a significant role in determining just how athletic we will be (and in what sports we will excel). Second, when it comes to training, we find that hard work is not all there is to it. For biology not only shapes our physiology, but also how our physiology responds to training (including how much muscle mass and aerobic capacity we are able to build through exercise). The fact is that we naturally vary widely in just how much we respond to exercise (to the point where some of us improve dramatically through exercise, whereas others of us respond hardly at all). And we also respond differently to different training regimens (to the point where a training regime that works for one person may in fact harm another). And while we may wish to take credit for just how hard we train, here too biology is found to play a role. For it turns out that we differ widely in just how naturally disposed we are to push ourselves. And over and above this, biology also influences how much we experience pain, such that even among those who experience the same desire to push themselves (both in training and in competition), one may find it much easier to handle the pain involved than the other--which, of course, can have a big impact on results. And speaking of pain, our biology even influences how easily we injure and how well we recover from our injuries--which, once again, has a significant impact on performance. As an added bonus, Epstein not only covers which biological factors have an impact on sports performance, but the evolutionary story of these biological factors (including why different populations that have adapted to different environments have come to acquire traits that make them well-disposed to different sports and disciplines [for example, why many elite marathoners have origins in East Africa, many elite sprinters have origins in West Africa, and many elite swimmers and weight-lifters have origins in Europe]). In short, then, biology plays much more of a role in elite athletic performance that we may have realized. Not that the point of the book is to say that athletic performance is all in our genes. Just the contrary, as mentioned above the book makes the point that genes always interact with the environment to produce athletic outcomes. Genes are essential in shaping the athlete, but just as essential is the athlete's upbringing and culture, and that they do in fact get the training that is needed to make the most of their natural talents. This book is a triumph. I can't imagine it would be possible to cover the topic better than the author has. The science involved is thoroughly researched; the anecdotes are perfectly chosen and add both context and interest (many of them are downright inspirational); and it is all presented in a very clear and thoroughly enjoyable way. Well done Mr. Epstein. A full executive summary of the book will be available at newbooksinbrief dot com, on or before Tuesday, August 20; a podcast discussion of the book will be available shortly thereafter.
Date published: 2013-08-13

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

THE BASICS

1Hello, Brain!A peek inside your 3-pound lump of crazy

HEART: Hone your passion, motivation, and identity

2I Wish I Felt More Like an Athlete:Tackling the flawed thinking around your athletic identity

3I Don't Think I Can:Building confidence and self-belief

4Setting Goals Is Not Your Problem:The secret of doing

WINGS: Deal with obstacles, setbacks, and conflict

5Other Athletes Seem Tougher, Happier, and More Badass Than Me:The power and peril of comparison

6I Feel Fat:Dealing with body image in a world of athletes

7I Don't Cope Well with Injury:How to respond to setbacks, big and small

8People Are Worried About Me:Exercise dependence and the incessant need to do more

FIGHT: Get stuck in with new battle skills

9I Don't Like Leaving My Comfort Zone:How to cross the fear barrier

10When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Leave Me Behind:Resisting the urge to quit

11I Need to Harden the F*ck Up:Learning to embrace the suck

12I Keep Screwing Up:Developing Jedi concentration skills to become a better athlete

13I Don't Handle Pressure Well:How to cope with stress, anxiety, and expectations on race day

Epilogue

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Authors

Editorial Reviews

"Lesley Paterson is one of the most mentally tough professional athletes I know, and Simon Marshall knows why. Their special sauce has finally been bottled and the strategies described in The Brave Athlete promise to help athletes of all abilities become dirty fast." -Tim Don, World Champion triathlete"Forget marginal gains, Dr. Simon Marshall understands the most important part of performance: the athlete's mind. His expertise is an invaluable resource to help athletes master theirs." -David Bailey, PhD, Head of Performance at BMC Racing Team"My training background and philosophy evolved under the coaching of Lesley and the mental slapping of Simon." -Jessica Cerra, professional cyclist"I have admired Dr. Simon Marshall's talent as a scientist and a communicator for more than two decades. In The Brave Athlete, he brings this talent to the fore as he translates psychological science into meaningful strategies to help athletes become more confident, motivated, and calm." -Dr. Kirsten Davison, Professor of Public Health, Harvard University"At the Leeds Triathlon Centre, we pay as much attention to psychology as we do to physiology. Few things are simple in sport but in The Brave Athlete, Simon and Lesley tackle the complexities of getting the best from yourself in a clear and engaging way." -Jack Maitland, Head Triathlon Coach, Leeds Beckett University"The Brave Athlete will take you deep inside yourself so that you can identify what you thought were your limits and, with Simon and Lesley's help, smash them to smithereens." -Bob Babbitt, host of Babbittville Radio, USA Triathlon Hall of Fame inductee"Simon and Lesley get to the heart of what it takes to be a brave athlete. It's about creating a mindset that goes to bat for you rather than against you. The Brave Athlete is an invaluable guide to help you sort your head out. Plus it's funny. Really bloody funny." -Flora Duffy, World Champion triathlete"Marshall and Paterson, in some kind of post-Western duo, limn their own version of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday. Only the guns and whiskey are replaced with doctoral degrees and world titles. In The Brave Athlete they challenge the reader to draw swords on the psychic battlefields of sport but do so with the gift of Continental mirth and compassion." -Scott Tinley, two-time Ironman World Champion, author, and teacher"Working with Lesley and Simon has been one of the biggest life-changing experiences." -Mauricio Méndez, XTERRA World Champion and Ironman 70.3 champion"Simon and Lesley bring years of training at the world-class level, in multiple sports, together with years of working in academia-all in the real world." -Janel Holcomb, professional cyclists and coach"Lesley's passion for helping others grow and enjoy a deeper sense of satisfaction with their lives is evident in everything she does. In her book, she expertly addresses the concerns and setbacks so many people face in their pursuits, and outlines a simple and elegant strategy for helping anyone become their very best." -Ben Hoffman, Professional Triathlete and Ironman Champion"I always struggled with my inner self and demons during races. Simon taught me not only how to deal with those demons, but how to manipulate them in such a way to take my racing to an entirely different level." -Kyle Hummel, Ironman 70.3 Age Group World Champion"The formula for this book is a winner and can be applied to any challenging situation." -Dr. Jacqueline Kerr, Professor of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California at San Diego"Dr. Simon Marshall and World Champion Lesley Paterson remind us that that the best kind of sport psychology is when evidence-based science meets the minds of real athletes. The Brave Athlete bridges this gap with humor and compassion, whilst revealing tenacity for moving forward. This book shows us how to cope with common demons that threaten to disrupt our performances and enjoyment of sport." -Dr. Alison Pope-Rhodius, Professor & Chair, Sport Psychology, JFK University"Combining their experience in triathlon, psychology, and writing, Lesley and Simon are a force to be reckoned with. They're brilliant and hilarious." -Mitch Thrower, Founder and Chairman of Events.com, Author, and 22x Ironman Triathlete"The tools I've learned from Simon are simply priceless, and to have it all encapsulated into a book for everyone to read is critical reading for any athlete looking to perform at their very best." -Amy Dixon, Paralympic Hopeful, ITU World Ranking: #5"Lesley has also shown me the ability to suffer like no other with the strategies outlined in The Brave Athlete. With these skills, neither family or sport is jeopardized, bringing a much-needed balance to my life." -Brandon Mills, age-group mountain biker"Dr. Marshall has such way of explaining the human mind, in the simplest terms and why we think the way we do. Both of them were there day one when I fought the biggest battle of my life: breast cancer, and I'm still winning. Simon and Lesley are coaches who 'walk the talk'!" -Marison Beniek, age group triathlete and breast cancer survivor