The Breadwinner Trilogy by Deborah EllisThe Breadwinner Trilogy by Deborah Ellissticker-burst

The Breadwinner Trilogy

byDeborah Ellis

Paperback | August 1, 2009

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"All girls [should read] The Breadwinner by Deborah Ellis." - Malala Yousafzai, New York Times

The three books in Deborah Ellis's Breadwinner trilogy bound into one handsome volume

Deborah Ellis's novels The Breadwinner, Parvana's Journey and Mud City have been a phenomenal success, touching the hearts of readers the world over.

Here are the three books bound into one handsome volume -- for readers new to Deborah Ellis and for those who would like a collector's edition for their libraries.

Deborah Ellis is best known for her Breadwinner series, which has been published in twenty-five languages and has earned more than $1 million in royalties to benefit Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan and Street Kids International. She has won the Jane Addams Children's Book Award, the University of California's Middle East Book A...
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Title:The Breadwinner TrilogyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:440 pages, 8.13 × 5.38 × 1.11 inPublished:August 1, 2009Publisher:Groundwood Books LtdLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0888999593

ISBN - 13:9780888999597

Appropriate for ages: 10

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Loved It! I read this book in one of my classes and I have to say it has been one of the most interesting and engaging stories I have ever read. I highly recommend reading the whole trilogy, it was absolutely great. #plumreview
Date published: 2017-09-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Love it Use this book in my class. Ellis pulls no punches with young readers. She is forthright and honest in her writing
Date published: 2017-09-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great series Was first introduced to the series in grade five, and at 21, I still like reading these books. They are socially relevant, as well as great stories as well.
Date published: 2017-09-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Breadwinner Trilogy This trilogy was emotional and well written.
Date published: 2017-07-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Enjoyed the series overall I found this book series kept me engaged and I enjoyed reading them. This book specifically though I found it difficult to progress through. The storyline felt all over the place with additional characters added again similar to the 2nd one and the prison story felt forced without explanation/closure. To me it felt like Ellis had so many ideas for this book but didn't portray them well as a whole. Would not recommend this book individually if I hadn't read the other 3.
Date published: 2017-03-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful trilogy Each book keeps you totally engaged. Wonderful stories
Date published: 2017-02-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this!! This book it such a great one! I enjoyed it so much. I cried so much and I re read this book 10000 times!! :) I recommend everyone to read this.
Date published: 2017-02-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great for middle school! This book would be the perfect introduction to the reality of war torn Afghanistan for any middle school aged child. It may sound a little weird to say because of the horrors that we may find happening in that part of the world, but I tend to love books that are set in Afghanistan. I am a huge fan of The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini, and those books would definitely be a good follow up for kids who read and enjoy The Breadwinner Trilogy. These books appeal to me because the realities of war and the horrible hardships faced by the people at the hands of the Taliban are heartbreaking and important to be aware of. I also have an interest in Middle Eastern culture (not the Taliban of course, but the actual culture of the Afghan people and country.) Ignorance about other countries, cultures, and struggles upsets me more than most things, and I think reading this book at a young age could definitely develop a cultural sensitivity and interest in young readers for world issues. After all, isn’t that what reading is all about? Being able to walk in someone else’s shoes and appreciate different lives and perspectives. I’m glad to say that my youngest sister was the person who recommended this book to me, and the middle school where I did one of my teaching internships also taught this book. If I ever end up teaching in a middle school, this is definitely a book I will have on the docket to pull out for a novel study. The edition of the book that I read contained all three novels in The Breadwinner Trilogy – The Breadwinner, Parvana’s Journey, and Mud City. In the first book, young Parvana has to pretend to be a boy in order to work and support her family in Kabul after her father has been arrested. A beautiful mix of childlike innocence and harsh tragedy, this book was very special and wonderful to read. Personally, I love reading from a child’s perspective because you get that innocent element. Seriously though, can we get any better than To Kill a Mockingbird or A Little Princess? They are some of my favourites! It was the second book in the trilogy that lost the teacup from me. It was all right, but compared to the first and the last book it seemed lacking and a bit unrealistic. Following three children and a baby through the wilds of Afghanistan was definitely a treacherous journey, but I didn’t buy it. Their survival seemed a bit far fetched. But as an 11, 12, or 13 year old reading it, I certainly think this wouldn’t be an issue. The final book, Mud City, follows Parvana’s former friend, Shauzia, as she tries to make her way in Pakistan in order to save enough money to get herself on a boat to France. This installment was just as good as the first for me and it’s hard for me to choose between the two for a favourite! I would recommend this trilogy to any young reader, in fact I think it is an important piece that all preteens should have on their shelves. I’m sure this simple and quick read will stay with you long after you close the final page, especially if you are young. I can definitely see this trilogy as one that would impact a young reader and become one of their most influential reads!
Date published: 2016-11-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great book series. My daughter got this for Christmas and is thoroughly enjoying the stories.
Date published: 2015-01-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for young and old alike. Wonderful, insightful reading. Right up there with The Red Tent and Kiterunner.
Date published: 2014-09-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from My son was given the first book in grade 5 to read for school. He asked me for the next two books and we were lucky to find the trilogy. He's read it over and over. He thought I'd like it, so I picked it up over vacation. It's a tremendously well written set of books. It is so easy to fall into war torn Afganistan. The characters come to life and become a part of you. I recently got the fourth book and once he's done with it, it will be mine!!!!
Date published: 2013-10-04

Editorial Reviews

"...a book...about the hard times - and the courage - of Afghan children." - Washington Post"[The books in the Breadwinner trilogy] are terrifying indictments of what war can bring to children and a powerful testaments to the ingenuity and strength of young people in times of terror." - Book Links"...an exceptional story that enlightens the reader about circumstances beyond comprehension and helps students understand that all of us in this global community share the same hopes, dreams, and fears." - Resource Links"...hands-down, Newberry Medal worthy...This was a fantastic read." - Washington Times"A great kids' book...a graphic geopolitical brief that's also a girl-power parable." - Newsweek"This is an important and compelling story for young people..." - Today's Librarian"Deborah Ellis would like to tell kids in war-torn countries that the war is over and they can live through this and that she hopes the world can learn from its previous mistakes" - Rebecca Bloomfield, The Denver Post