The Bubble Star by Lesley-Anne BourneThe Bubble Star by Lesley-Anne Bourne

The Bubble Star

byLesley-Anne Bourne

Paperback | October 1, 1998

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The characters, setting and atmosphere of The Bubble Star are both rural (northern Ontario) and urban (Toronto). The novel focuses primarily on women -- three sisters -- and their relationships with each other and with men. We have marriage, we have affairs, we have a bit of sex, including a scene in an upscale bamboo furniture boutique. One of the secondary characters is a gay male. A lesbian couple appears, and one of the women is married to a professor who is having an affair with one of the sisters working in retail.

When asked by Dale Zieroth (editor of Event magazine) what she feared most about the publication of The Bubble Star, Lesley replied, `That people will read it and think it's a sitcom.' When Zieroth asked her what she hoped for the most from this novel, she answered `That people will read it and think it's a sitcom.' Bourne goes on to say that she expects her audience will be anyone who reads The New Yorker, anyone who works in retail (because the novel has central characters who work in retail), or anyone who watches the Shopping Channel.

Lesley-Anne Bourne was born in North Bay, Ontario, in 1964, and received an Honours B.A. from York University and an M.F.A in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Three collections of her poetry have been published: The Story of Pears (1990), which was a finalist for the Gerald Lampert Award; Skinny Girls (1993); a...
Title:The Bubble StarFormat:PaperbackDimensions:160 pages, 8.72 × 5.54 × 0.57 inPublished:October 1, 1998Publisher:Porcupine's QuillLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0889841993

ISBN - 13:9780889841994

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Customer Reviews of The Bubble Star

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Sisters are doin' it for themselves! The Bubble Star is a collection of stories/novel about three sisters and their relationships with the men in their lives. The writing is accomplished and the stories are engaging and often hilarious. I heard Ms. Bourne read at the 1998 Eden Mills Writers' festival; she's a writer to watch.
Date published: 1998-12-07

From Our Editors

The Bubble Star reads like a sitcom and that's the intention. The characters, setting and atmosphere in this first novel by poet Lesley Anne Bourne reflect both rural northern Ontario and urban Toronto. The plot revolves around three sisters, their relationships with each other and with men. Marriage, affairs and even sex in an upscale bamboo furniture boutique make for a wry novel of manners and life working in retail, owing as much to the New Yorker as it does the Shopping Channel.

Editorial Reviews

The characters, setting and atmosphere of The Bubble Star are both rural (northern Ontario) and urban (Toronto). The novel focuses primarily on women -- three sisters -- and their relationships with each other and with men. We have marriage, we have affairs, we have a bit of sex, including a scene in an upscale bamboo furniture boutique. One of the secondary characters is a gay male. A lesbian couple appears, and one of the women is married to a professor who is having an affair with one of the sisters working in retail.When asked by Dale Zieroth (editor of Event magazine) what she feared most about the publication of The Bubble Star, Lesley replied, `That people will read it and think it's a sitcom.' When Zieroth asked her what she hoped for the most from this novel, she answered `That people will read it and think it's a sitcom.' Bourne goes on to say that she expects her audience will be anyone who reads The New Yorker, anyone who works in retail (because the novel has central characters who work in retail), or anyone who watches the Shopping Channel.`Lesley-Anne Bourne has that rare thing, a voice that rings truer than true, and the drop-dead timing of a stand-up comic. But her vision is tragic, her placement always at odds with the world in which she passes.'