The Building in the Text: Alberti to Shakespeare and Milton

Paperback | April 15, 2008

byRoy Eriksen

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In The Building in the Text, Roy Eriksen shows that Renaissance writers conceived of their texts in accordance with architectural principles. His approach opens the way to wide-ranging discussions of the structure and meaning of a variety of literary texts and also provides new insights into the famed architectural ekphrases of Alberti and Vasari.

Analyzing such words as "plot," "topos," "fabrica," and "stanza," Eriksen discloses the fundamental spatial symmetries and complexities in the writings of Ariosto, Shakespeare, and Milton, among other major figures. Ultimately, his book uncovers and clarifies a tradition of literary architecture that is rooted in antiquity and based on correspondences regarded as ordering principles of the cosmos.

Eriksen’s book will be of interest to art historians, historians of literature, and those concerned with the classical heritage, rhetoric, music, and architecture.

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In The Building in the Text, Roy Eriksen shows that Renaissance writers conceived of their texts in accordance with architectural principles. His approach opens the way to wide-ranging discussions of the structure and meaning of a variety of literary texts and also provides new insights into the famed architectural ekphrases of Alberti...

Roy Eriksen is Professor of Interdisciplinary Italian Renaissance Studies at the University of Oslo in Rome.
Format:PaperbackDimensions:216 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.5 inPublished:April 15, 2008Publisher:Penn State University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0271027835

ISBN - 13:9780271027838

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“The Building in the Text, by bringing together material from a number of sources and applying it to an analysis of how evolving rhetorical conventions shaped the compositional, structural, and visual from of early modern literary production, offers the reader an important interdisciplinary study of how architecture and rhetoric converged over time and emerged in the Renaissance in the form of writing and poetry that was recognizably architectonic and visual in nature.”—Douglas A. Brooks, South Central Review