The Business Of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters Of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

Hardcover | May 1, 1988

by.. Buffalo, Sarah J. Blackstone

not yet rated|write a review
The Business of Being Buffalo Bill provides new insight into a colorful figure in American history. William F. Cody was interested in developing the American West through irrigation, transportation, and settlement. He invested heavily in development projects such as mining, newspapers, and an entire town, Cody, Wyoming. In his correspondence, Cody discussed his various failures and successes, talked of personal problems, and spoke of his longing to end his show business career and retire to the West he loved. These candid letters present a unique view of Buffalo Bill as a man of many interests and enthusiasms. Containing previously unpublished correspondence between Cody and his business partners, relations, and friends, this volume examines Cody's business endeavors and his personal relationships.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$119.97 online
$136.50 list price (save 12%)
In stock online
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

The Business of Being Buffalo Bill provides new insight into a colorful figure in American history. William F. Cody was interested in developing the American West through irrigation, transportation, and settlement. He invested heavily in development projects such as mining, newspapers, and an entire town, Cody, Wyoming. In his correspo...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:143 pages, 8.26 × 5.42 × 0.7 inPublished:May 1, 1988Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275928896

ISBN - 13:9780275928896

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of The Business Of Being Buffalo Bill: Selected Letters Of William F. Cody, 1879-1917

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

?These letters are reproduced almost exactly as Cody wrote them. While his wording is clear and vivid, his lack of formal education shows in his disregard for capitals and punctuation. As he once said, the reader could put the punctuation in wherever he wanted it.?-Pacific Northwest Quarterly Old West