The Business Of Slavery And The Rise Of American Capitalism, 1815-1860 by Jack  Lawrence SchermerhornThe Business Of Slavery And The Rise Of American Capitalism, 1815-1860 by Jack  Lawrence Schermerhorn

The Business Of Slavery And The Rise Of American Capitalism, 1815-1860

byJack Lawrence Schermerhorn

Hardcover | April 28, 2015

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Calvin Schermerhorn’s provocative study views the development of modern American capitalism through the window of the nineteenth-century interstate slave trade. This eye-opening history follows money and ships as well as enslaved human beings to demonstrate how slavery was a national business supported by far-flung monetary and credit systems reaching across the Atlantic Ocean. The author details the anatomy of slave supply chains and the chains of credit and commodities that intersected with them in virtually every corner of the pre–Civil War United States, and explores how an institution that destroyed lives and families contributed greatly to the growth of the expanding republic’s capitalist economy.
Calvin Schermerhorn teaches history in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies at Arizona State University. He is the author of Money over Mastery, Family over Freedom: Slavery in the Antebellum Upper South.
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Title:The Business Of Slavery And The Rise Of American Capitalism, 1815-1860Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.88 inPublished:April 28, 2015Publisher:Yale University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0300192002

ISBN - 13:9780300192001

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Editorial Reviews

“Essential reading for any scholar interested in slavery, western expansion, and the political economy in the antebellum United States. Schermerhorn’s lively prose and obvious passion for the material makes this work compelling. This book demonstrates that the any assessment of the history of capitalism in the United States that ignores the critical, deplorable business of the slave trade is woefully inadequate.”—Civil War Book Review