The Campaigns Of General Nathan Bedford Forrest And Of Forrest's Cavalry: CAMPAIGNS OF LIEUT-GEN NB…

Paperback | August 22, 1996

byGeneral Thomas Jordan, J.p. Pryor

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In June 1861, practically unschooled, without military training or experience, Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821–1877) enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private. Yet by the Civil War's end he was a lieutenant general whose dazzling exploits and bloody victories caused him to be regarded by his Northern opponents as a "devil," by Southerners as a living legend, and by historians as the greatest cavalry commander and one of the few authentic military geniuses produced by the war. His spectacular, unparalleled career has intrigued generations of Civil War scholars and enthusiasts. Subsequent biographies or studies of him have never totally superseded The Campaigns of General Nathan Bedford Forrest (1868) by General Thomas Jordan (West Pointer and chief of staff to Generals Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Braxton Bragg) and the professional journalist J. P. Pryor. Forrest himself gave them complete access to his military papers, spent many hours in interviews with them, and closely supervised their writing. Hence, this work is not just a flat campaign study of Forrest—in effect, it is his military memoir and as such remains the most valuable source on Forrest and his cavalry.

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From Our Editors

In June 1861, practically unschooled, without military training or experience, Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) enlisted in the Confederated Army as a private. Yet by the Civil War's end he was a lieutenant general whose dazzling exploits and bloody victories caused him to be regarded by his Northern opponents as a "devil", by Southe...

From the Publisher

In June 1861, practically unschooled, without military training or experience, Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821–1877) enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private. Yet by the Civil War's end he was a lieutenant general whose dazzling exploits and bloody victories caused him to be regarded by his Northern opponents as a "devil," by Souther...

From the Jacket

Forrest himself gave the authors complete access to his military papers, spent many hours being interviewed by them, and closely supervised their writing. Hence, this work is not just a flat campaign study of Forrest--in effect, it is his military memoir and, as such, remains the most valuable source on Forrest and his cavalry.

General Thomas Jordan,West Pointer, was the chief of staff to Generals Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Braxton Bragg. J. P. Pryor was a professional journalist
Format:PaperbackDimensions:736 pages, 8.25 × 5.38 × 1.59 inPublished:August 22, 1996Publisher:Da Capo Books

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:030680719X

ISBN - 13:9780306807190

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In June 1861, practically unschooled, without military training or experience, Nathan Bedford Forrest (1821-1877) enlisted in the Confederated Army as a private. Yet by the Civil War's end he was a lieutenant general whose dazzling exploits and bloody victories caused him to be regarded by his Northern opponents as a "devil", by Southerners as a living legend, and by historians as the greatest cavalry commander and one of the few authentic military geniuses produced by the war. His spectacular, unparalleled career (no high-ranking commander since medieval times personally killed as many enemies in combat as Forrest did) has intrigued generations of Civil War scholars and enthusiasts. Subsequent biographies or studies of him have never totally superseded The Campaigns of General Nathan Bedford Forrest (1868) by General Thomas Jordan (West Pointer and chief of staff to Generals Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Braxton Bragg) and the professional journalist J. P. Pryor. Forrest himself gave them complete access to his military papers, spent many hours being in