The Capacity for Civic Engagement: Public and Private Worlds of the Self by D. LevineThe Capacity for Civic Engagement: Public and Private Worlds of the Self by D. Levine

The Capacity for Civic Engagement: Public and Private Worlds of the Self

byD. Levine, David P Levine

Hardcover | February 2, 2011

Pricing and Purchase Info

$141.06 online 
$143.00 list price
Earn 705 plum® points

In stock online

Ships free on orders over $25

Not available in stores

about

How do we form a connection to the ideals and institutions of public life? This connection is sometimes expressed in the language of civic engagement, public service, and commitment to the public good. While we do not lack for literature to guide us in thinking about public life, we have less to call on when our problem is not only to explore public ideals and institutions, but also to consider the nature and origin of our capacity to make a connection with and find meaning in those institutions and ideals. Levine explores the nature and origin of this capacity to form a connection and find meaning.

David P. Levine is Professor of Economics at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Prior to joining the School of International Studies in 1987, he was Chair of the University’s Department of Economics. Between 1973 and 1981, he was Assistant and Associate Professor of Economics at Yale University.  Professor Levine was ed...
Title:The Capacity for Civic Engagement: Public and Private Worlds of the SelfFormat:HardcoverDimensions:204 pagesPublished:February 2, 2011Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan USLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230102832

ISBN - 13:9780230102835

Customer Reviews of The Capacity for Civic Engagement: Public and Private Worlds of the Self

Reviews

Table of Contents

Civic engagement * Engagement and trust * Subjectivity and Mourning * Tolerance * Diversity * Teaching and Learning * Common ground

Editorial Reviews

"Considering the historical moment we are living through and the current policy debates and political challenges for an ostensibly polarized America, David Levine asks some fundamental questions not asked presently by most economists, political scientists, policy analysts and academics, politicians, and public administrators--questions that ought to be at the forefront of the present dialogue in American politics. The author gives us a persuasive conceptual framework for understanding the paradox of civic engagement in the liberal state."--Michael A. Diamond, Professor and Director, Center for the Study of Organizational Change, Harry S Truman School of Public Affairs, University of Missouri