The Chaco Anasazi: Sociopolitical Evolution in the Prehistoric Southwest by Lynne SebastianThe Chaco Anasazi: Sociopolitical Evolution in the Prehistoric Southwest by Lynne Sebastian

The Chaco Anasazi: Sociopolitical Evolution in the Prehistoric Southwest

byLynne Sebastian

Paperback | August 28, 1996

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In the tenth century AD, a remarkable cultural development took place in the harsh and forbidding San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. From small-scale, simply organized, prehistoric Pueblo societies, a complex and socially differentiated political system emerged that has become known as the Chaco Phenomenon. This study combines information on political evolution with archaeological data to produce a sociopolitically based model of the rise, florescence, and decline of the Chaco Phenomenon.
Title:The Chaco Anasazi: Sociopolitical Evolution in the Prehistoric SouthwestFormat:PaperbackDimensions:196 pages, 9.72 × 6.85 × 0.43 inPublished:August 28, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521574684

ISBN - 13:9780521574686

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. The Chaco Phenomenon: background and history of research; 3. Sociopolitical complexity and the Chaco system; 4. Routes to sociopolitical power; 5. Previous explanations for the Chaco Phenomenon; 6. Relations of power, labor investment, and the political evolution of the Chaco system; 7. Summary and new directions; Appendix: the computer simulation.

Editorial Reviews

"In an easy-to-read and enjoyable book, especially the last two chapters, Sebastian has created a nontypological starting point for new, wide-ranging cultural-ecological-social-political debates about the nature and process of the Chacoan phenomenon....Geographers who work with prehistoric data will find this book to be, at least, thought provoking and, at best, a paradigm-revising addendum to their worldview of the prehistoric Southwest." The Geographical Review