The changing race relationship in the border and northern states

Paperback | October 12, 2012

byHannibal Gerald Duncan

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ... them gallery seats. If they admit Negroes they lose many of their white patrons, and this group they cannot afford to lose. Neither can we blame the Negroes for wanting to go to these shows. The play is advertised to arouse the curiosity of the passerby. The Negro is as much aroused as the white person and has the same desire to go and see. Negroes, as a rule, do not wish to be intruders, but unless they "butt in" they do not get to see any plays or shows in most Northern cities. In practically all the towns in the South, Negroes either have theatres and "movies" of their own, or some provision is made for them to go to the white theatre or "movie." The privileges which are granted the Negroes in the South are well understood by both groups, and the white people seem just as much adverse to usurping the privileges of the Negroes as the Negroes are themselves. But in the North it is hard for the Negroes to know just what privileges are granted them. A Southern Negro traveling in the North said to me: "In the South we have our place, every body knows where it is, and no one takes it from us. But in the North, if we have a place, no one seems to know where it is." 4. Barbershops and bootblack stands are some more places of public accommodation where race prejudice is making headway. In the South there are barbershops run by white men for white men, barbershops run by Negroes for the accommodation of white men, and barbershops run by Negroes for the accommodation of Negro men. Often both white and Negro barbers work in the same shop side by side. In the North we find some similar arrangement. The difference being that in the North Negroes are supposed to get accommodations in any barbershop; and but...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ... them gallery seats. If they admit Negroes they lose many of their white patrons, and this group they cannot af...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:46 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.1 inPublished:October 12, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217620132

ISBN - 13:9780217620130

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