The Chickencoop Chinaman and The Year of the Dragon: Two Plays

Paperback | November 1, 1981

byFrank ChinPhotographed byFrank ChinContribution byDorothy R. McDonald

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When first produced in 1972 and 1974, these two plays created an enormous stir. Some critics condemned the playwright, others praised him. In susequent years his work has had a profound impact on a generation of young Asian American writers. With the publication of this volume, the plays can now be read and debated and enjoyed by a larger audience.

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From Our Editors

Book of Plays: The Year of the Dragon barges through the comfortable stereotypes of the Asian American-the quiet, hardworking contented character who keeps to himself, rarely bothering the white community. It is not an 'easy' play. The language is frequently strong, and the bitterness, even when wrapped in some very funny comedy, is un...

From the Publisher

When first produced in 1972 and 1974, these two plays created an enormous stir. Some critics condemned the playwright, others praised him. In susequent years his work has had a profound impact on a generation of young Asian American writers. With the publication of this volume, the plays can now be read and debated and enjoyed by a lar...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:172 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.53 inPublished:November 1, 1981Publisher:University Of Washington Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0295958332

ISBN - 13:9780295958330

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From Our Editors

Book of Plays: The Year of the Dragon barges through the comfortable stereotypes of the Asian American-the quiet, hardworking contented character who keeps to himself, rarely bothering the white community. It is not an 'easy' play. The language is frequently strong, and the bitterness, even when wrapped in some very funny comedy, is unrelenting... But as a portrait of an Asian American's furious struggle for identity, the play is a searing statement, a powerful cry.'

Editorial Reviews

One does not have to agree with Chin’s views to be profoundly affected by his arguments. They are well observed, richly detailed and sharply focused.

- Pacific Citizen