The Child Reader, 1700-1840 by M. O. GrenbyThe Child Reader, 1700-1840 by M. O. Grenby

The Child Reader, 1700-1840

byM. O. Grenby

Hardcover | March 28, 2011

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Children's literature, as we know it today, first came into existence in Britain in the eighteenth century. This is the first major study to consider who the first users of this new product were, which titles they owned, how they acquired and used their books, and what they thought of them. Evidence of these things is scarce. But by drawing on a diverse array of sources, including inscriptions and marginalia, letters and diaries, inventories and parish records, and portraits and pedagogical treatises, and by pioneering exciting new methodologies, it has been possible to reconstruct both sociological profiles of consumers and the often touching experiences of individual children. Grenby's discoveries about the owners of children's books, and their use, abuse and perception of this new product, will be key to understanding how children's literature was able to become established as a distinct and flourishing element of print culture.
Title:The Child Reader, 1700-1840Format:HardcoverDimensions:338 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.83 inPublished:March 28, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521196442

ISBN - 13:9780521196444

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Owners; 3. Books; 4. Acquisition; 5. Use; 6. Attitudes; 7. Conclusions; Select bibliography.

Editorial Reviews

'A wonderful book - and beautifully produced ... a very important contribution to children's literature, the history of the book, and the history of reading ... it's certainly the kind of book which scholars in the field will want to buy ... but also some dissertation students in literature and history.' Helen Rogers