The Church on the Worlds Turf: An Evangelical Christian Group at a Secular University by Paul A. Bramadat

The Church on the Worlds Turf: An Evangelical Christian Group at a Secular University

byPaul A. Bramadat

Hardcover | June 15, 2000

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Is it possible for conservative Protestant groups to survive in secular institutional settings? Here, Bramadat offers an ethnographic study of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship (IVCF) at McMaster University, a group that espouses fundamentalist interpretations of the Bible, women's roles,the age of the earth, alcohol consumption, and sexual ethics. In examining this group, Bramadat demonstrates how this tiny minority thrives within the overwhelmingly secular context of the University.

About The Author

Paul A. Bramadat is at University of Winnipeg.
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Title:The Church on the Worlds Turf: An Evangelical Christian Group at a Secular UniversityFormat:HardcoverPublished:June 15, 2000Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195134990

ISBN - 13:9780195134995

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"Rejecting stereotypes of evangelicals as 'illiterate hillbillies,' he focuses 'on evangelicals' creativity in the face of the perciecved hegemony of the secular ethos.' In this way, he challenges what he calls the 'profound condescension' he has 'encountered when discussing evangelicals withliberal Christians, academics, and friends.'"-- Theological Studies