The Cicero Spy Affair: Cicero Spy Affair

Hardcover | October 15, 1999

byRichard Wires

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Posing as a valet to Britain's ambassador to Turkey, Elyesa Bazna (codename Cicero) nearly exposed the plans for the Allied invasion of Normandy through his sale of sensitive British documents to the Germans.

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From Our Editors

The invasion of Normandy is an infamous battle of World War II. Elyesa Bazna, posing as a valet to Britain’s ambassador to Turkey, came very close to tipping off Germany, but didn’t succeed. The Cicero Spy Affair examines how Germany had access to British secrets during this war. Richard Wires, a former intelligence officer, tells the ...

From the Publisher

Posing as a valet to Britain's ambassador to Turkey, Elyesa Bazna (codename Cicero) nearly exposed the plans for the Allied invasion of Normandy through his sale of sensitive British documents to the Germans.

Format:HardcoverDimensions:288 pages, 9 × 6 × 1 inPublished:October 15, 1999Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275964566

ISBN - 13:9780275964566

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From Our Editors

The invasion of Normandy is an infamous battle of World War II. Elyesa Bazna, posing as a valet to Britain’s ambassador to Turkey, came very close to tipping off Germany, but didn’t succeed. The Cicero Spy Affair examines how Germany had access to British secrets during this war. Richard Wires, a former intelligence officer, tells the untold story of this embarrassing episode.

Editorial Reviews

?Wires is superb, with research as definitive as a field riddled with intentionally misleading sources will permit, with analysis that asks all of the right and important questions, and with lively, cool prose that retains the drama inherent in the story without a hint of exaggeration. This book, which appears in David Kahn's series, Perspectives on Intelligence History, is a model for the field...Time and again Wires presents the evidence, weighs it with care, and gives us his own considered conclusions. Wires no doubt is helped in his balancing act by having degreed in European history and in law, and having served in southern Germany in the Counter-Intelligence Corps, as well as having lived in London, but his best ally is a sturdy commonsense. The result is an astute, sensible, very readable book that is unlikely ever to be overtaken by the work of others...a fine book: were that there were more like it in this crowded and often murky field.??Albion