The Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and Truth by Brad PragerThe Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and Truth by Brad Prager

The Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and Truth

byBrad Prager

Paperback | November 19, 2007

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Werner Herzog is renowned for pushing the boundaries of conventional cinema, especially those between the fictional and the factual, the fantastic and the real. The Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and Truth is the first study in twenty years devoted entirely to an analysis of Herzog's work. It explores the director's continuing search for what he has described as 'ecstatic truth,' drawing on over thirty-five films, from the epics Aguirre: Wrath of God (1972) and Fitzcarraldo (1982) to innovative documentaries like Fata Morgana (1971), Lessons of Darkness (1992), and Grizzly Man (2005). Special attention is paid to Herzog's signature style of cinematic composition, his "romantic" influences, and his fascination with madmen, colonialism, and war.

Brad Prager is assistant professor of film studies and German studies at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the author of Writing Images: Aesthetic Vision and German Romanticism.
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Title:The Cinema of Werner Herzog: Aesthetic Ecstasy and TruthFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pagesPublished:November 19, 2007Publisher:Columbia University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1905674171

ISBN - 13:9781905674176

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Table of Contents

AcknowledgementsIntroduction: Framing Werner Herzog1. Madness on a Grand Scale2. Madness on a Minor Scale3. Mountains and Fog4. Faith5. War and Trauma6. An Image of AfricaConclusion: Cinematic PoesisFilmographySources and BibliographyIndex

Editorial Reviews

An essential introduction to one of the world's greatest and most idiosyncratic filmmakers.