The Citizen Of A Republic; What Are His Rights, His Duties, And Privileges, And What Should Be His Education by Ansaldo Ceb

The Citizen Of A Republic; What Are His Rights, His Duties, And Privileges, And What Should Be His…

byAnsaldo Ceb, Ansaldo Ceba

Paperback | October 14, 2012

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Este libro histórico puede tener numerosos errores tipográficos y texto faltante. Los compradores pueden descargar una copia gratuita escaneada del libro original (sin errores tipográficos) desde la editorial. No indexado. No se muestra. 1845 edition. Extracto: ... his duty to his country, without bestowing patient reflection upon the wants of the government of the republic. It will hardly be necessary to enumerate the vicious passions to which the favorites of fortune are so generally exposed. Those who become very rich are generally proud and overbearing, and act as though they were masters of everything; in as much as they can purchase everything with their own money. They are delicate in their mode of living, to make a display of their felicity--arrogant in opinions, because they see many have need of them--like one who is better supplied with money than brains--impatient of the rule of others, and if their riches are newly acquired, says Aristotle, they are the worst of the whole class. Dante perhaps had them in his eye when in replying to Jacopo Rusticucci, he exclaims against his city: La gente nuova, e i subiti guadagni, Orgoglio e dismisura han generata, Fiorenza, in te, sicche tu gik ten piagni.(28) In Aristophanes, Cremilus tells us, these people are insatiable-above all, and complete cowards, and another poet adds, that they forget that they touch the earth with their feet, and are begotten of mortal sires--they would thunder with Jove and even sit at his table. But the greatest misery of all is, that they stand in greater need of luxuries than beggars of bread.--Horace says of them: Exilis domus est, ubi non et plura supersunt;(29) and the solicitudes and anxieties they sustain in continually heaping and hoarding up, show very clearly, that after all they are even in their own opinions anything but rich, for Aristotle declares, that being rich, consists more in using than in having money. The admonitions of the poet ought to have convinced...

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Title:The Citizen Of A Republic; What Are His Rights, His Duties, And Privileges, And What Should Be His…Format:PaperbackDimensions:54 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.11 inPublished:October 14, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217576753

ISBN - 13:9780217576758

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