The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World by Edward Dolnick

The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern World

byEdward Dolnick

Paperback | February 7, 2012

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New York Times bestselling author Edward Dolnick brings to light the true story of one of the most pivotal moments in modern intellectual history—when a group of strange, tormented geniuses invented science as we know it, and remade our understanding of the world. Dolnick’s earth-changing story of Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the birth of modern science is at once an entertaining romp through the annals of academic history, in the vein of Bill Bryson’s A Short History of Nearly Everything, and a captivating exploration of a defining time for scientific progress, in the tradition of Richard Holmes’ The Age of Wonder.

About The Author

Edward Dolnick is the author ofDown the Great Unknown,The Forger’s Spell, and the Edgar Award-winningThe Rescue Artist. A former chief science writer at theBoston Globe, he lives with his wife near Washington, D.C.

Details & Specs

Title:The Clockwork Universe: Isaac Newton, the Royal Society, and the Birth of the Modern WorldFormat:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.94 inPublished:February 7, 2012Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0061719528

ISBN - 13:9780061719523

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“[Dolnick] offers penetrating portraits of the geniuses of the day . . . who offer fertile ground for entertaining writing. [He] has an eye for vivid details in aid of historical recreation, and an affection for his subjects . . . [An] informative read.”