The CMEA in Crisis: Toward a New European Order? by Vladimir SobellThe CMEA in Crisis: Toward a New European Order? by Vladimir Sobell

The CMEA in Crisis: Toward a New European Order?

byVladimir Sobell

Hardcover | July 1, 1990

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This book identifies the essential features of the Soviet bloc's economic nexus: the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA), and Gorbachev's reforms. It describes the impact of reforms on the CMEA and speculates on this organization's future. The author links the recent developments within the CMEA with the wide ranging, fundamental changes in the politics and economics of the Soviet bloc. It also examines the connection between the recent upheaval of the Eastern Alliance to the general flux on the entire European continent in anticipation of the post-1992 abolition of internal trade barriers in the European Community. Sobell argues that the predictions of the CMEA's disintegration must be seen in the context of the planned acceleration of West European unification in the 1990s. The EC is poised to become the core of the post Cold-War Europe and will act as a magnet on other European countries, including CMEA members. The CMEA in the age of perestroika, Sobell contends, will continue to maintain its communist facade, but will be a profoundly different organization with increasingly dynamic links with Western Europe.
Title:The CMEA in Crisis: Toward a New European Order?Format:HardcoverDimensions:120 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:July 1, 1990Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275937305

ISBN - 13:9780275937300

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?This short but timely book juxtaposes the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance and the perestroika reforms, analyzes the effect of the latter upon the former, and speculates on the future of both. The author, well qualified for his task, interprets the implicit Soviet subsidization of Eastern Europe as a dubious blessing, since it preserves the industrial distortions and inefficiencies of the member economies. Efforts to revive CMEA integration are ironically likely to bring about a de facto disintegration of the grouping, since genuine reforms are bound to expose its flawed economic rationale as a trade-destroying organization. Increasingly dynamic links are foreseen between CMEA members and the EC, especially after the switch to hard-currency accounting for CMEA and the post-1992 abolition of internal trade barriers in the EC. Compare with Andras Koves, The CMEA Countries in the World Economy (Budapest, 1985). Upper-division and graduate collections.?-Choice